Armistice

Thank You. Merci.

I just wanted to take a few minutes to thank everyone who has accessed, shared, or used the World War I diary of my great-grandfather Albert Huet. Since February, it has been viewed more than 1,700 times. I can’t believe it. And neither can my grandfather, who is amazed that his dad’s story would be interesting to so many people.

In an effort to further enhance the project, I would now like to know how colleagues are using Albert Huet’s diary. I’m therefore requesting that anyone who has used the diary in her/his research or teaching to let me know (hhuet at ufl.edu) how it has helped you. I’m eager to learn about your experience and to link your projects/assignments/articles/books on my website.

Merci d’avance.

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Albert Huet

The World War I diary of my great-grandfather, Albert Huet, has been digitized. You can find a short biography (in French) as well as the link to the collection at: https://helenehuet.org/albert-huet-wwis-diary/. Also, I added a transcription on my website for each page. For example, see https://helenehuet.org/albert-huet-wwis-diary/page-5/. As Albert entered the war a century ago, I wanted to pay homage to him and the millions of soldier who died during World War I.

In honor of my great-grandfather

As today is November 11 and we are also commemorating the centennial of World War 1, I thought I should share with you an excerpt from my great-grandfather’s diary, that he wrote after the war ended. We found his diary a few years ago, in my grandparents’ garage, and it was a very emotional moment for all of us. My great-grandfather, Albert Huet, was a young man from Normandy when he entered the war in 1916 (he had just turned 18), and after being gassed a few weeks before the Armistice, he suffered all his life from lung issues.

Page 3 of Albert Huet's Diary.

Page 3 of Albert Huet’s Diary.