Digital Humanities

FSU Digital Humanities Graduate Program – deadline March 30, 2018; tuition waiver and stipend

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What is digital humanities?

Digital humanities embraces a wide variety of activities that, in different ways, bring together data science, computing, data curation, and humanistic study. Work in the digital humanities can range from digital exhibitions in museums and libraries, to the work of scholars using computers to analyze literature and art, to study of and engagement with social media and social networks, to the practice of digital publication and media.

Why should I pursue a degree in digital humanities?

Students of digital humanities can apply their skills and expertise in universities and cultural heritage institutions or in a variety of roles in non-profit or private industry which require a combination of both traditional “soft” skills in the liberal arts and the digital skills of the 21st century. Though some students will come to digital humanities as a way to prepare for pursuing a Ph.D. in a discipline and in order to do research specifically in digital humanities, others will find digital humanities a pathway to humanistic careers well beyond the academy. Students will find in digital humanities the tools for engaging with humanities in a new and different way than they had before.

What is the Master’s degree program like?

FSU’s digital humanities MA degree is a 2-year degree hosted in the Program in Interdisciplinary Humanities. The program is highly flexible and individualized to suit each student’s chosen specialty within the large field of possibilities open to digital humanists. There are a series of core classes where students learn essential digital humanities skills for data analytics (DH 1: Humanities Data), data curation (DH 2), and for communicating and teaching (Digital Pedagogy). Students are also part of a growing and vibrant community of digital humanities scholars across many departments and schools of the university, including the Office of Digital Research in the University Libraries and the Digital Scholars group sponsored by the History of Text Technology Program in the Department of English. Beginning in 2018, PIH will host its own digital humanities workshop series. A collaborative digital humanities lab will start work in the coming year as well.

How much does it cost?

All students in the program are fully funded. Students are provided with a full stipend (13K +) and tuition waiver in exchange for service as teaching assistants and, in the second year of study, as instructors of record for an undergraduate course.

Questions?

For more information, contact the director of the graduate program, Dr. Allen Romano, at aromano@fsu.edu.

Information can also be found on the website, http://pih.fsu.edu, under “Program”

To Apply:

Visit http://admissions.fsu.edu/graduate/

The program in digital humanities is open to students from all majors, including especially all humanities disciplines, library or information studies, and any computing disciplines.

Applications require a statement of purpose, 3 letters of recommendation, and a sample of written or (if applicable) digital work.

Application deadline is March 31, 2018.

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Call for Proposals: International Studies/Digital Humanities Symposium at the University of North Florida

On March 9, 2018, the University of North Florida will host a one–day symposium examining intersections between international studies and the digital humanities. This event is cosponsored by the UNF International Studies Program, the UNF Digital Humanities Initiative (DHI), and the UNF Center for Instruction and Research Technology (CIRT).

We will begin with a panel discussion (noon–1:15 PM, Building 58W/Room 3703) addressing the implications of digital tools and methodologies for how we understand problems in the world today, interact across cultural boundaries, and deal with matters of cultural heritage in a globalized world. Our panelists will be Crystal Andrea Felima, CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Caribbean Studies Data Curation, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida; Josh Gellers, assistant professor of political science, University of North Florida; Hélène Huet, European studies librarian, University of Florida, and vice–chair, Florida Digital Humanities Consortium; Barry Mauer, associate professor of English and director, Texts and Technology Ph.D. program, University of Central Florida; and Tiffany Earley–Spadoni, assistant professor of history, University of Central Florida.

This discussion will be followed by an interactive showcase of digital projects (1:30–2:45 PM, Building 58W/Rooms 3804–3806) that are international in nature or that involve methodologies that may be applicable to the interdisciplinary field of international studies.

Lastly, we will hold an open conversation about opportunities for statewide collaboration on Digital Humanities endeavors (3:00–4:00 PM, Online Learning Laboratory, Building 10/Room 1102).

As part of the 1:30–2:45 showcase, we invite students, faculty and staff from UNF and other regional institutions and universities to present on digital projects, at any stage of development. To propose a project, please send a document with the following information to Clayton McCarl (clayton.mccarl@unf.edu), director of the UNF International Studies Program, by February 16, 2018: 1) full title of poster/presentation; 2) names of all participants, with academic/professional titles (or major/program of study for students); 3) a description/abstract of the material to be presented (150–250 words); 4) name of faculty mentor or project leader, where applicable, and 5) an explanation of any special needs regarding technology or equipment.

Digital Scholarship at UF Workshop, February 2, 2018

I am pleased to invite you to the Digital Scholarship at UF Workshop which will take place at the Digital Worlds Institute on February 2, 2018 from 9am to 5pm.

During this day-long event you will be able to attend three workshop sessions focused on tools and tips to help you start, develop, or improve your digital projects.

The sessions are as follows:

  • 3D Data Acquisition and Dissemination
  • 3D Printing and Augmented Reality with Aurasma
  • Best Practices for Project Management & Collaboration

Following the three sessions, we are also hosting a Digital Project Showcase where members from the UF community are invited to present their digital projects.

As you will see on the registration form (https://ufl.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3jBZ3E1SniaRPGB), you can decide to register for the Workshop Series and/or the Digital Showcase. Registration is free and lunch will be provided.

Please note that the registration for the workshop series is capped at 50 attendees and the registration for the showcase is capped at 20 presenters. If you plan on presenting your digital project during the showcase, we recommend you bring your own laptop if possible, though we will be able to provide up to 12 workstations if needed.

You can find more information about the workshops and the schedule at this link: http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/digitalufworkshop.

Please email Hélène Huet if you have questions: hhuet at ufl dot edu

This event is sponsored by a George A. Smathers Libraries Strategic Opportunities Grant and the Digital Worlds Institute.

Digital Scholarship Workshop

2018 UF Conference on Comics and Graphic Novels “ImageTech”

2018 UF Conference on Comics and Graphic Novels
“ImageTech”

On April 6th-8th, 2018, UF will be hosting its 15th annual Conference on Comics and Graphic Novels, “ImageTech: Comics and Materiality” in Gainesville, Florida.

Call For Papers

The Graduate Comics Organization at the University of Florida invites applicants to submit proposals to the 15th UF Conference on Comics and Graphic Novels, “ImageTech: Comics and Materiality.” The conference will be held from Friday, April 6 through Sunday, April 8, 2018.

The medium of comics has always prompted comics creators to work in concert with, and push against, the technologies through which their works are produced and distributed. As print and digital technologies have become more sophisticated, accessible, and affordable, some comics creators have embraced innovative digital technologies, while others prefer pen and ink on paper. From the meticulous series of woodblock prints, to the humble black-and-white photocopied zine, to the decade-long online epic, comics are fundamentally concerned with technologically-determined formats and materiality.

The goal of this conference is to not only explore relationships among comics and various technologies, but to interrogate the digital/analog divide in comics creation and scholarship. How does form dictate content, and vice versa? How do digital platforms impact engagement and accessibility? How do changes, improvements, and advances in technologies push comics creators and scholars to reevaluate our understanding of comics as a medium? Why do some comics creators deliberately adhere, or return, to analog technologies? In short: how do we understand and approach the material considerations of comics?

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Digital comics (comics created and/or hosted/distributed digitally)
  • Print forms and “legitimacy” (monetization, privileged status of print)
  • Comics thematically or visually concerned with technologies (steampunk, cyberpunk)
  • Comics incorporating elements of other media (flash animation, animated gifs)
  • Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) comics
  • Comics made using unusual/older technologies (wood-block prints, paper cut-outs, collage, found materials) and/or creators’ use of disparate technologies
  • Zines or other periodicals that incorporate comics
  • Transitions in specific comics series from print to digital or from digital to print (potential problems/losses, transitioning forms as “translation,” introduction or removal of page turns and/or gutters)
  • Impact of social media on proliferation of image-texts (reblogs, memes, remixes, fandom/fan art, fan/composer dialogues)
  • Format and accessibility (hosting platforms, open source vs. paywalls, ads, digital copying, replication/reproduction, coding, easter eggs)
  • Comics as a format for critical scholarship

Presentations should be 15-20 minutes in length and must be delivered in English. “ImageTech” also invites creative projects related to the conference theme. Discussion panels from multiple presenters coordinated around a central topic or theme are welcome. Proposals of 200-300 words, plus a short bio and A/V requirements, should be submitted to gco@english.ufl.edu by December 15th, 2017.

LACC hosts ARL Fellowship for Digital and Inclusive Excellence Recipient

The Latin American and Caribbean (LACC) is hosting Katiana Bagué, recipient of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Fellowship for Digital and Inclusive Excellence, during the 2017-2018 academic year. The objective of this initiative is to expose undergraduate students from underrepresented communities to the field of librarianship and digital scholarship in order to promote diversification in the library science profession.

Bagué is a fourth-year art history student at the University of Florida in Gainesville. While she specialized in Latin American art, she worked at LACC supporting public services, curating book exhibits, processing colonial Latin American manuscripts and researching Latin American books and material culture. Under the supervision of Margarita Vargas-Betancourt, Ph.D., UF Latin American and Caribbean Special Collections Librarian, and Hélène Huet, Ph.D., UF European Studies Librarian, Katiana will use art history knowledge to challenge underrepresentation in the library science profession.

For more information on the program, visit the ARL website. To see the current roster of fellows, see here.

50th anniversary of Dian Fossey’s Karisoke Research Center: Online and Offsite Exhibit at UF

My colleagues Dan Reboussin and Richard Freeman are currently curating an exhibit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dian Fossey’s Karisoke Research Center, where Fossey studied wild mountain gorillas in the Virunga Mountains of Rwanda until her death in 1985. Several of the 30 beautiful photographs on display (by photographer Bob Campbell) were featured in two National Geographic magazine cover stories that propelled Fossey to international recognition in the early 1970s.

The Sept. 2017 issue of National Geographic and a 3 part NatGeo Channel television series narrated by Sigourney Weaver scheduled for December also feature several of the images currently on display here at UF. On view until December 15th, 2017 the exhibit is located in the first-floor lobby of Smathers Library.

An online exhibit is also available at http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/BobCampbell. Selected digitized images from the collection of 15,000 original slides are available in UF Digital Collections at http://ufdc.ufl.edu/wildlife.

12th Annual Symposium of Spanish and Portuguese Studies. January 27, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

12th Annual Symposium of Spanish and Portuguese Studies

January 27, 2018 at the University of Florida, Reitz Student Union

The Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies at the University of Florida cordially invites submissions for our 12th Annual Symposium of Spanish and Portuguese Studies.

We invite proposals for both individual presentations and panels (maximum of three presentations) from graduate students and faculty on topics related to Hispanic and Lusophone literature, linguistics, foreign language pedagogy, and other interdisciplinary studies, including Digital Humanities.

Please send a one-page abstract (approximately 250 words) to pfernand@ufl.edu

In the accompanying email, please provide the following information: your name, the presentation’s title, your position and institutional affiliation, and your preferred email address. Abstracts and presentations may be in Spanish, English, or Portuguese.

The submission deadline is November 1, 2017.

The keynote presentation for this year’s symposium is “The Digital Library of the Caribbean and Digital Humanities: Opportunities and Resources for Research, Teaching, and Collaboration” by:

Dr. Leah Rosenberg is an Associate Professor of English at the University of    Florida. She teaches Caribbean and Postcolonial studies, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary courses. A member of the advisory board of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com) since 2008, she has worked to build its dLOC’s holdings in Anglophone Caribbean literature and history as well as its pedagogical materials and ability to support collaborative teaching.

Dr. Hélène Huet is the European Studies Librarian at UF and oversees many international collections. As a digital humanist and the Vice-Chair of the Florida Digital Humanities Consortium (FLDH), a collective of institutions in Florida that seeks to promote an understanding of the humanities in light of digital technologies and research, she is particularly interested in studying how digital tools can help facilitate students and faculty’s research.

Dr. Laurie N. Taylor is a Digital Scholarship Librarian at UF, where her work focuses on socio-technical (people, policies, technologies, communities) needs for scholarly cyberinfrastructure. Her work activities are geared towards enabling a culture of radical collaboration that values and supports diversity and inclusivity, including as the Digital Scholarship Director for the Digital Library of the Caribbean                                         (dLOC) and is the Editor-in-Chief for the LibraryPress@UF.

Please direct questions to the Organizing Committee at pfernand@ufl.edu

PhotoKeynote

Poster of the Call for Papers