Category Archives: Digital Humanities

Call for applications: “Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute,” a 2019-2020 NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Apply for the Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute 

Applications are due by February 1, 2019

Thanks to generous funding from the NEH, the Institute is pleased to be able to cover travel costs and offer a small stipend for participants. Participation includes 5 phases, with required attendance at the in-person session (May 20-24, 2019) and for virtual sessions (July-December 2019), along with creation of teaching materials (January-August 2020). Please see For Participants for more information on the Institute phases and funding.

Call for Applications

Call for Applications: “Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute,” a 2019-2020 NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Deadline: Applications are due Friday, February 1, 2019

Application Information: http://dloc.com/teach/apply

Partners in the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) are pleased to invite applications to an NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities entitled “Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute.” This Institute is designed for anyone who teaches or supports Caribbean Studies courses or sections dealing with Caribbean Studies in courses. This Institute is also aimed at people who are interested in learning ways to utilize digital collections and implement digital tools and methods into their teaching and collaborative practices. We seek participants who are looking to create new resources for teaching Caribbean Studies in multiple fields and varying types of institutions, as well as enhance the community of practice for engaging with DH. We welcome applications from professors, instructors, graduate students, and library faculty and staff.

Participants will gain DH teaching experience and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools (Scalar, TimelineJS, StoryMapJS, Mapping), processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty-six participants will acquire concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections. Through participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH, they will also learn to create Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies.

Program:

Comprised of introductory readings, a week-long in-person session (held May 20-24, 2019 at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida), and virtual sessions and online communication in the year following through August 2020, the Institute is structured to give participants the time and space to learn new approaches as well as integrate them into research and teaching. The overall goals of the Institute include gaining expertise in digital tools, with digital collections, and as part of a community of practice. Over the course of the program, participants will be supported in collaborating together and in developing teaching materials to be shared as Open Access.

See the Institute website for a more detailed schedule: http://dloc.com/teach/schedule

Institute Directors and Faculty:

Please see the Institute website for details on the directors and faculty: http://dloc.com/teach/faculty

Application Details:

The Institute will select 26 participants who regularly teach Caribbean Studies courses or sections dealing with Caribbean Studies in courses in related fields (e.g., history, literature, cultural studies, Black Studies, Global Studies). The classes can be at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and instructors, librarians, staff, and graduate students can apply. As we mentioned earlier, we are interested in recruiting participants who are looking to create new resources for teaching Caribbean Studies in multiple fields and varying types of institutions, as well as enhance the community of practice for engaging with DH.

Please see the Institute website for more details about stipends and conditions of award for participants: http://dloc.com/l/teach/forparticipants

Application to the Institute should include:

  • An up-to-date CV (short version, preferred).
  • A statement of interest (1-2 pages) that provides:
    • description of current teaching assignments and responsibilities
  • Optional:
    • description of a course, proposed course, or sample syllabus that engages with the Caribbean through the themes of migration, mobility, or sustainability.

Please send materials by February 1, 2019 to laurien@ufl.edu.

Applications will be reviewed by the selection committee (Taylor, Huet, Ortiz, Rosenberg, Asencio, and Felima).

The team will notify participants of acceptance by March 15, 2019.

The Institute’s priority will be to select a diverse mix of participants from institutions across the US, including specifically recruiting from Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, HBCUs, and HSIs given the rich collections, communities, and teaching connections related to Caribbean Studies. Priority also will be given to select participants from various humanities fields. Additionally, while Florida is the third most populous state, Caribbean Studies spans the whole of the US as a home to the diaspora. For those selected from Florida, priority will be given to those from institutions not represented on the project team.

More Information and Questions:

Please see the Institute website (http://dloc.com/l/teach/dhinstitute) for further details. Questions may be directed to laurien@ufl.edu

Final Acceptance

For final acceptance starting in March, participants will confirm:

  1. Attendance for the in-person Institute and virtual sessions
  2. That by June 2020 they will submit two DH assignments, developed by taking part in the Institute, for inclusion in dLOC’s Teaching Guides & Materials Collection for use by others. As with all materials in dLOC, participants retain all rights and may elect to share their materials via other repositories and websites.

Please contact the project director, Laurie Taylor, with any questions: laurien@ufl.edu

Logo of the NEH

 

 

 

 

 

This Institute has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this Institute, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

 

Inaugural FLDH Conference, March 2019

I am very excited to announce that the Florida Digital Humanities Consortium (FLDH) will be hosting its inaugural statewide conference at the University of North Florida (UNF) on March 29-30, 2019.

Friday, March 29, will be a formal research symposium, and Saturday, March 30, will follow a more spontaneous THATCamp format. The deadline for submissions to the Friday, March 29 portion of the conference is December 15, 2018. For more information and to submit a proposal, see https://www.unf.edu/dhi/Inaugural_FDLH_Conference.

 

George A. Smathers Libraries in partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean Receive $231,093 National Endowment for the Humanities Grant Award

In partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean, University of Florida researchers led a collaborative project, which has been awarded $231,093 to host a week-long, in-person workshop and five additional monthly virtual workshops on collaborative Digital Humanities (DH) and Caribbean Studies. The project is entitled Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Advanced Institute. The lead researchers will open a call in October to select participants for the program. Participants will gain DH teaching experience and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools, processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty-six participants will achieve: 1) acquisition of concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections; 2) participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH; and, 3) creation of Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies.

Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Advanced Institute is the most recent of ongoing initiatives by UF and the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) for building capacity and community for Caribbean digital libraries, from digitization for access and preservation, to building upon digitized materials for research and teaching. The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) is a cooperative digital library for resources from and about the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean. The dLOC partner institutions are the core of dLOC. dLOC partners retain all rights to their materials and provide access to digitized versions of Caribbean cultural, historical and research materials currently held in archives, libraries, and private collections. This is the first Advanced Institute with UF and dLOC, and it will enable greater engagement with more community members on critical needs and opportunities in the digital age for research and teaching.

Laurie Taylor, PhD, UF’s digital scholarship librarian and the dLOC’s digital scholarship director, is the lead investigator, and is collaborating with the co-principal investigators, Hélène Huet, PhD, European studies librarian; Paul Ortiz, PhD, Director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program in the Department of History; and  Leah Rosenberg, PhD, professor of Caribbean Literature in the Department of English.

WWI Diary of Albert Huet: New Features

I have been redesigning the “WWI Diary of Albert Huet” project for the past few weeks and I am happy to announce the following new features:

  • A biography in English of Albert and some information about the project and the diary.
  • Information about the translation project that was led by Dr. Lynn E. Palermo from Susquehanna University and completed in June 2018.
  • The diary which now features for each page: the image, the transcription, the standardized French text, and the English translation. Users can easily navigate from tab to tab. Each image is linked to the original file in the University of Florida’s Digital Collections. At the bottom of each page, you can find links to the previous and next pages of the diary. There is also now a list of all the pages of the diary, should users want to navigate to a very specific page.
  • The additional documents related to Albert’s life in the army now feature two photos taken by my aunt of Albert’s two “croix de guerre”.

My goal was to make the diary more useful to scholars, students, and the broader public in general. I am so thankful to my family for letting me digitize all of these documents and sharing them with the world.

Mapping Decadence Update: New Content Added

Hello everyone,
I finally found some time to update Mapping Decadence and I am pleased to say that I have added the following content to my website:

  • An introduction to my analysis of Huysmans, Lorrain, Rachilde and Schwob‘s maps.
  • Story Maps for each author. The last slide includes a link to the larger map in case people want to see a bigger version of it.  But my Story Maps are interactive, that is to say, the pop-ups can still be displayed.
  • A short bibliography.

Again, this is my interpretation, my analysis, and I am sure many will disagree or see something different in the maps, which is great. This is what makes scholarship so rich. My goal originally was to have the maps and the data available for anyone interested in Decadence and France so I hope this proves useful.

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age: Présentation du projet British Library, 16 mai, 2018, 11am-12pm (Miami Time).

carribean
Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age est une série de séminaires en ligne mettant en avant la recherche et l’enseignement numériques et publics des Etudes Caribéennes. Cette série fournit un environnement propice à la collaboration pour les professionnels et leur permet de partager leurs expériences, de discuter de leurs projets, cela afin de favoriser la communication et de soutenir les efforts de toutes et tous.
Notre prochain séminaire, Présentation du projet British Library, se déroulera le 16 mai 2018 de 11h du matin à midi (heure de Miami).
Présentatrice: Marie-France Guillaume
Cliquez ici pour participer à la session en ligne: https://ufl.zoom.us/j/8927374603
Présentation du projet British Library
La BHFIC est fondée en 1912, et est ouverte au public depuis 1920. Elle contient différents types de journaux, ce depuis le 19 siècle. Vu l’état des documents, l’idée était donc venue de les numériser afin de les sauvegarder, et souvent la BHFIC est la seule institution à posséder ces journaux.
Ainsi, en avril 2014, en partenariat avec dLOC, la BHFIC a commencé avec le travail de numérisation. En mai 2017, nous avons reçu un don de la British Library dans le cadre du programme « Endangerd Archives ». Ce qui fait que maintenant nous disposons de deux appareils de numérisation, ainsi que de deux techniciens pour faire le travail. La subvention de British Library couvre les journaux du 19e siècle et c’est un contrat qui s’étend sur deux années, incluant le salaire des deux techniciens ainsi qu’un abonnement internet.
En janvier 2018, nous avons remis à la British Library un disque dur d’1 TO contenant les documents déjà numérisés. Un autre a été donné en mars avec la suite. Le travail continue et avec l’assistance de dLOC quand le besoin se fait sentir.
Nous espérons à travers ce travail, dans la mesure où nous trouvons de l’aide, passer à la mise en ligne de la BHFIC, car nous voulons rendre les documents disponibles pour le monde entier. Les numériser c’est la première étape, mais c’est aussi important qu’ils soient disponibles sur internet pour la formation d’un plus grand nombre.
Biographie : Marie-France Guillaume
Je travaille à la BHFIC depuis septembre 2012 à titre de Directrice Exécutive. Après des études en informatique, et des séminaires en numérisation à FIU, je suis actuellement étudiante en Sciences Juridiques. Depuis mon arrivée à BHFIC, mon grand souci c’était d’essayer de sauvegarder les documents qui sont souvent en très mauvais état étant donné leur ancienneté. Grâce à dLOC, à Fokal et maintenant avec British Library, ce projet voit le jour. De 2014 à nos jours nous avons numérisé plus de 20.000 pages de journaux. Jusqu’à la subvention de British Library, nous avions un seul technicien, maintenant nous en avons deux et le travail va plus rapidement.
A propos de la série de séminaires en ligne Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age:
La Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), en partenariat avec le Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida, Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), la Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, la Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) de la Société des Archivistes Américains (SAA), et le Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), a organisé Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, une série de séminaires en ligne mettant en avant la recherche et l’enseignement numériques et publics des Etudes Caribéennes. Cette série fournit un environnement propice à la collaboration pour les professionnels et leur permet de partager leurs expériences, de discuter de leurs projets, cela afin de favoriser la communication et de soutenir les efforts de toutes et tous.
Les séminaires de la série en 2018 sont les suivants:

Continuez la discussion lors de la conférence annuelle d’ACURIL en 2018, dont le thème est Accès Ouvert : http://acuril2018republicadominicana.com/
Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship

Workshops at the University of Florida in May

Please join us  for the following workshops:
Wednesday, May 9, 1-3 pm
Introduction to 3D Technologies and Augmented Reality
Marston Science Library, Rm L136
Workshop created and hosted by graduate students Brittany Mistretta and Francisco Morales
Wednesday, May 16, 1-2 pm
Introduction to Project Management
Library West 212 (Scott Nygren Scholars Studio)
Workshop created and hosted by graduate students Holland Hall and Patrick Daglaris

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age: Ramble Bahamas, May 7, 2018, 11am-12pm (Miami Time).

carribean
Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.
Please join us for an upcoming event, Ramble Bahamas, May 7, 2018, 11am-12pm (Miami Time).
Presenters: Dr. Tracey Thompson and Jessica Dawson, University of The Bahamas
Click here to participate in the online event: https://ufl.zoom.us/j/8927374603
About the Presentation:
2017 marked the fiftieth anniversary of a watershed in Bahamian political life: the advent of majority rule. So as to pay tribute to that anniversary in an appealing and enduring way, “From Dat Time”: The Oral & Public History Institute of the University of The Bahamas (“FDT”) launched an ambitious venture in the field of digital humanities. The “FDT” team, guided by the Institute’s mandate to develop curricular and recreational materials in a variety of media, committed itself to fashioning a digital heritage trail through which Bahamian students could retrace important steps in the Bahamian political story. The team went further: it envisioned building a platform that could serve as a publication engine for all research undertaken by the Institute. Such a platform, so the team judged, would augment limited scholarly publication in the field of Bahamian political history. It would widen access to historical literature among students and educators located throughout the far-flung Bahamian archipelago. It would draw on the Institute’s strength as a vehicle devoted to collecting and preserving oral narratives of community elders, many of whom had played significant roles in social, educational, and political transformations in the mid-1900s. It would press into service a media archive consisting of rare photos and film from the 1960s and 1970s – images long hidden from public view. The result of the team’s investment was Ramble Bahamas. Utilizing the Omeka content management system and the Curatescape framework, Ramble Bahamas presents geographically-tagged exhibits about historically significant places and objects in The Bahamas. Each exhibit is comprised of a narrative outlining the importance of the location or object, relevant historic and contemporary images, and oral history audio or video clips in which informed narrators speak of events associated with the location or object. Since its launch in November 2016, Ramble Bahamas has been introduced to students at the University of The Bahamas and to high school teachers of History and Geography. Plans are under way to integrate the platform into national curricula in History so as to advance the nation-building mandate of the university.
About the Speakers:
Tracey Thompson, PhD: As Director of “From Dat Time”: The Oral & Public History Institute of the University of The Bahamas, Tracey Thompson oversees the research programme and administrative processes of the institute. Tracey has been involved in research, teaching, and administration at the University of The Bahamas for more than twenty-five years. Her research foci lie principally in African and African Diaspora History, in Philosophy of History, in Oral History, and in Public History.
Jessica Dawson, MA: In her capacity as Public History Fellow in Research & Technology for “From Dat Time”: The Oral & Public History Institute of the University of The Bahamas, Jessica Dawson acted as webmaster and curator for Ramble Bahamas. Prior to this, she taught tertiary courses in the field of cultural anthropology and worked in historic preservation. She holds a B.A. in Anthropology from Washington State University and an M.A. in American Studies & Public History from Youngstown State University.
About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:
The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida, Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA)of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.
Webinars in the 2018 series are:

Please join us for next stage conversations at ACURIL’s 2018 annual conference, focusing on Open Access in Caribbean Libraries, Archives and Museums: Opportunities, Challenges and Future Directions http://acuril2018republicadominicana.com/
Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age: New Webinars

carribean
Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.
Please join us for an upcoming event, Digitization Training for dLOC Partners, April 2, 2018, 11:30am-12:30pm (Miami Time). Presenter: Laura Perry
Click here to participate in the online event: https://zoom.us/j/3982941835
About the Presentation:
The Digitization Training for dLOC contributors will provide a broad overview of the digitization process. At the end of this webinar, users will have a better understanding of metadata creation, digitization using a flatbed scanner, dSLR camera set-up, file editing and naming, folder structure, serial hierarchy creation and file delivery.
About the Speaker:
Laura Perry, Manager of Digital Production Services. Laura manages the team that conducts digitization and ingests content into the UF Digital Collections (UFDC) and the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC).  She serves as a resource for providing information on best practices for digitization and digital preservation.
About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:
The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida, Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.
Webinars in the 2018 series are:

  • April 2, 11:30-12:30pm: Digitization Training for dLOC Contributors (English)
    • Presented by Laura Perry, University of Florida
  • April 9, 11am-12pm: Demystifying Digital History (English)
    • Presented by Dr. Debbie McCollin, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad
  • May 7, 11am-12pm: Ramble Bahamas (English)
    • Presented by Dr. Tracey Thompson and Jessica Dawson, University of The Bahamas (Facilitator: Crystal Felima)
  • May 16, 11am-12pm: Présentation du projet British Library (French)
    • Presenter: Marie-France Guillaume, Bibliothèque Haïtienne des Frères de l’Instruction Chrétienne (Facilitator: Dr. Hélène Huet)

Please join us for next stage conversations at ACURIL’s 2018 annual conference, focusing on Interdisciplinary Research in the Caribbean: http://libguides.uwi.edu/acurilconference2018
Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship
 
 
 

Digital Humanities Study Abroad, UF in Trinidad and Tobago

UF Digital Humanities & Public History Study Abroad in Trinidad & Tobago

The deadline to apply for UF in Trinidad and Tobago, a new and unique study abroad opportunity during Summer B, is little more than a week away—March 15.
UF in Trinidad and Tobago is designed to immerse students in the history and cultures of Trinidad and the broader Caribbean through oral history fieldwork and digital humanities production. Major themes of the course are religion, Trinidadian literature, anti-slavery and anti-colonial movements, oral history, historical memory, and public history. Excursions include Nelson Island, the island of Tobago, key heritage and eco-tourist sites, beaches, and more.
Dr. Ortiz, the lead faculty instructor and director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, is very excited to bring students to Trinidad and Tobago for a fun, immersive, and hands-on learning experience.
Students will earn six history credits at the 4,000-level through the program. Visit the link below to apply. Please send any application or program questions to portiz@ufl.edu or akotipoyina@gmail.com.
https://www.abroad.ufic.ufl.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=12655