DH

Workshop Announcement: Information Analysis: The Role of Visualization Tools and Cloud Computing Platforms in Collaborative Research and Teaching

It is my pleasure to announce the following FLDH sponsored workshop that will take place just before HASTAC 2017.Capture.

See here the full workshop announcement: http://fldh.org/fallworkshop/

Webinar announcement: “Beyond Trinkets: The Value of 3D in the Library,” May 10, 2017, at 9:30am (Miami Time)

carribean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event, “Beyond Trinkets: The Value of 3D in the Library,” May 10, 2017, at 9:30am (Miami Time).

Presenter: Dr. Sara Gonzalez, Marston Science Library, University of Florida

Click here to participate in the online event: http://ufsmathers.adobeconnect.com/Caribbean

About the Presentation:

“Beyond Trinkets: The Value of 3D in the Library”

In spring 2014, the UF Libraries opened its 3D services to the university and public.  This service, funded by student technology fees, expanded from 2 small 3D printers in the science library to now include 4 branch libraries with 10 3D printers, and circulates multiple portable 3D printers and scanners.  The library accepted over 1000 3D orders last year and librarians regularly teach workshops to the campus community and public, along with offering specialized consultations regarding 3D scanning and printing.

This presentation will provide an introduction to 3D printing and scanning technology, describe the opportunities and challenges of offering 3D technology in a library, and provide case studies that illustrate the potential of 3D across disciplines.

About the Speaker:

Sara Gonzalez is a science librarian at the University of Florida where she is the physical sciences and mathematics liaison and coordinates UF Libraries’ 3D Service and the MADE@UF software and virtual reality development lab.  She holds a Ph.D. in Geophysics from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an M.L.I.S. from Florida State University.  Her current research interests include emerging technologies in libraries, modeling and visualization of data, and scientific literacy instruction. Dr. Gonzalez recently co-authored 3D Printing: A Practical Guide for Librarians (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016).

About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:

The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Other upcoming webinars in the series include:

  • Date pending for: Caribbean Memory

Recordings of all webinars will be available in dLOC soon after the webinar.

Please join us for next stage conversations from the webinars, to take place at ACURIL’s 2017 annual conference, focusing on Interdisciplinary Research in the Caribbean: http://acuril2017puertorico.com/

Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship

Twitter: @dlocaribbean

Issues in Humanities Data Sharing

I would like to share with you the gist of the presentation I gave to the National Federation of Advanced Information Services 2016 Humanities Roundtable in Atlanta in September 2016.

For this talk, I focused on one of the biggest barriers to humanities data sharing: fear. Fear can take many forms, but the one I wanted to discuss was the fear of not getting credit.

This fear of not getting credit is what framed my talk. First, I explained how this fear has impacted, and in some cases inhibited, my work as a digital humanist. Second, I discussed how I have tried to overcome this fear. Third and finally, I discussed how, as a liaison librarian, I am trying to help faculty and graduate students overcome their own fears of not getting credit for their work.

Fear as a Digital Humanist

First, it is important for me to point out that the fear of not getting credit has prevented me from sharing more information as part of my digital humanities project, Mapping Decadence. Where did this fear originate and why did I become afraid of putting too much information on my website?

The fear was instilled in me at the very beginning of graduate school, years before I started developing my project. Some faculty members made it clear that publishing articles was the most important thing I could do to advance my career. While my digital project was interesting and “trendy”—and thus an asset on the job market—what mattered more were the articles I could base on this project. As such, when I started working on my DH mapping project, I was advised not to put too much information online. Doing so, I was warned, might enable other scholars to steal my work (and thus prevent me from getting my articles in print).

Retrospectively, I should have realized that making my research available online would only enhance my profile and help me on the job market. And so it did.

Just as importantly, sharing my research allows me to fulfill my original goal for Mapping Decadence. The reason I wanted to create a DH project in the first place was to be able to share my work/data with everyone who has internet access. I don’t believe our research should only be only accessible to a happy few.

What are the steps I have taken to try to overcome my fear of not getting credit? (spoiler alert: I still worry about not getting credit)

  • I listened to colleagues and collaborators who told me that my project would be greatly enhanced by sharing more information. These individuals include:
    • Kathy Weimer (Head of Kelley Center for Government Information, Data, and Geospatial Services at Rice University) during a GIS workshop for the international DH conference in Sydney, Australia;
    • Miriam Posner (DH program coordinator at UCLA)’s students who reviewed my project for a class (I found these reviews by chance when googling my website);
    • Paige Morgan, DH librarian at the University of Miami.
  • In each case, my reviewers consistently informed me that I needed to share more data.
    • Some of the information that I was encouraged to share has or will be easy to add to the project. These modifications include noting the sources of my data and adding legends to my maps.
    • Nevertheless, there are others kinds of information my reviewers asked me to share that will pose greater challenges – not least because of my deeply-instilled fears. These include sharing my analyses/results. This kind of modification to the project remains a roadblock, as I am on the TT and I need to publish an analysis of my data in article form for tenure.

Dealing with others’ fears as a liaison librarian

Finally, as a liaison librarian, I have tried to help faculty and graduate students overcome their fear of not getting credit. Let me start by sharing a little anecdote: I met a professor once who explained that s/he only presents papers that have already been accepted for publications because s/he does not want their research stolen. I am sure we all know someone who does this kind of thing. But I have to say, this is so far from the way I see and do things that, as a liaison librarian and a scholar, I have been actively working to help others deal with their fears.

This is why I believe that “education” is the keyword here. The first step I take is talking about the advantages of putting one’s work online (enhancing one’s scholarly profile, earning colleagues’ goodwill, etc.). The second step I take is reminding scholars that there are large and important aspects of their work that they can share without revealing their conclusions or endangering their publications.

What are my strategies to provide education that would help scholars overcome their fears?

  • Educate colleagues about the Institutional Repository (IR@UF where I work for instance). Many people believe that, simply because they’ve published an article on a topic, it is now widely available to others. Introducing colleagues to the IR thus helps acquaint them with larger research accessibility issues while directing them to institutional resources that will help put their work before a wider audience.
  • Provide education through Digital Humanities working groups: help organize talks and invite speakers who have experience in the digital world, promote the events to my patrons and incite them to attend the talks/workshops, etc.
  • Use examples that show colleagues how sharing data can result in positive career outcomes. Rather than seeing data sharing as an invitation to data theft, I want scholars to view data sharing as a way to boost one’s profile, attach one’s name to a project, and advance other scholars’ work in the process. The benefits of sharing thus far outweigh possible risks.

This is not to say these strategies always work. It can be hard to get meetings with faculty to discuss IR/DH/data and it is much easier when this is done on a 1-on-1 basis. But little by little, my hope is that humanities scholars will overcome their fear and see the benefits of data sharing.

Webinar Series: Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age

carribean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event featuring innovative digital work in Dominica on January 18, 2017, at 11am (Miami Time).

Presenter: Dr. Schuyler Esprit, Dominica State College, Create Caribbean Inc.

Click here to participate in the online event: http://ufsmathers.adobeconnect.com/Caribbean

About the Presentation:

In the small island developing state of the Commonwealth of Dominica, the push towards Information and Communications Technology (ICT) development has risen rapidly on the national agenda. This is true for several sectors, including entrepreneurship and education. However, national efforts to understand the impact of expanding technologies, particularly through the use of digital humanities or humanities computing, has been much slower despite collective enthusiasm among library and museum experts, academics and other intellectuals workers about developing the technological scope and reach of their work. For the most part, efforts and resources to encourage ICT use have minimized these very knowledge and culture nerve centers that inform the content of entrepreneurship through technology. Create Caribbean Inc. is a research institute located in Dominica, designed on the principles and values of digital scholarship and practicing digital humanities methodologies, and is one of the first of its kind in the English-speaking Caribbean to formalize the confluence of archival studies, heritage preservation, academic research, higher education curriculum development and the wave of technological advancement. Founded in 2014, the Institute has entered into a partnership with the Dominica State College to institutionalize and create national conversation and impact on innovative knowledge acquisition and sharing amidst economic and geographic constraints that create large social gaps in access to libraries, research, cultural activities and technological experimentation. This presentation will explore the best practices of Create Caribbean Inc., the Research Institute at Dominica State College to consider its goals and objectives, growth process, challenges and plans for enhancement and expansion beyond Dominica and into the wider Caribbean. The presentation will outline the role of each of the institute’s core areas – heritage preservation, academic research, higher education curriculum development, college teaching and community outreach – through the lens of the digital humanities and its impact on the Caribbean space. I will also include a discussion of the benefits of adopting digital humanities vocabulary, theory and praxis within the region, adapting those elements to considerations of economic, social and political peculiarities of the Caribbean.

About the Speaker: Dr. Schuyler Esprit is a scholar of Caribbean literature and cultural studies, and postcolonial theory.  Dr. Esprit holds a PhD in English literature from University of Maryland – College Park. She is the Founding Director of Create Caribbean Inc. (http://createcaribbean.org/create/), Research Institute at Dominica State College. The Research Institute supports students and scholars to use digital technologies for research, teaching and learning in areas of Caribbean development, especially its culture, history and heritage. She currently works as Dean of Academic Affairs at Dominica State College. Dr. Esprit has also taught and held professional positions at a number of universities in the United States. She is now completing her book entitled West Indian Readers: A Social History and its digital companion, both of which are historical explorations of reading culture in the Caribbean. She has also written the introduction to the 2016 Papillote Press edition of The Orchid House, the 1953 novel by Dominican writer Phyllis Shand Allfrey.

About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:

The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, and the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Other upcoming webinars in the series include:

  • Feb. 28, 11am Miami time: Dr. Alex Gil on small axe: archipelagos
  • 11, 11am Miami time: Nathan Dize and Abby Broughton on Colony in Crisis
  • May 10, 11am Miami time, Dr. Sara Gonzalez on 3D printing services
  • Date pending for: Caribbean Memory

Recordings of all webinars will be available in dLOC soon after the webinar.

Please join us for next stage conversations from the webinars, to take place at ACURIL’s 2017 annual conference, focusing on Interdisciplinary Research in the Caribbean: http://acuril2017puertorico.com/

Twitter: @dlocaribbean

 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Caribbean Studies Data Curation at UF

Guess what? The University of Florida is partnering with CLIR to offer a CLIR/DLF Postdoctoral Fellowship in Data Curation for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

RANK: Postdoctoral Fellow

REPORTS TO: Digital Scholarship Librarian

SALARY: Salary is $65,000

TIME-LIMITED: This is a time-limited position for two years, funded by the Council on Library & Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellowship in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, 2017-2019.

JOB SUMMARY

The George A. Smathers Libraries seeks a Postdoctoral Fellow in Caribbean Studies Data Curation to serve the University of Florida (UF), a major, comprehensive, land-grant, research university, which is among the nation’s most academically diverse public universities. The successful candidate will, as part of a dynamic and collaborative team, develop data curation services for Caribbean Studies.[1] The candidate will develop new initiatives in data curation and forge new collaborations and relationships that extend the Libraries’ capacity to support the University’s interdisciplinary research and technology initiatives – building upon a foundation of library-campus collaboration to date and work of the Data Management/Curation Working Group, Latin American & Caribbean Collections, and UF’s role as a founding partner and technical host for the international collaborative Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC).

Reporting to the Digital Scholarship Librarian (also the dLOC Digital Scholarship Director), the Postdoctoral Fellow will contribute to the development of long-term data management infrastructure for specific needs for Caribbean Studies; liaise with internal and external experts in Caribbean Studies to identify needs for data curation; liaise with the dLOC team to extend supports and content within dLOC; and serve as a consultant with researchers on Caribbean Studies data curation data issues. The Postdoctoral Fellow will collaborate with the dLOC Digital Scholarship Director, dLOC Technical Director, UF Data Management Librarian, and UF Latin American & Caribbean Collections Librarians and Archivists to develop and conduct trainings for librarians, archivists, and researchers on data curation practices, resources, and processes from a situated perspective for Latin American & Caribbean Studies.

The Postdoctoral Fellow will join the existing team that is building a full system (with training, outreach, liaison duties, policies, procedures, technologies, tools, workflows, etc.) of data curation, and will support extending and enriching the team by contributing subject-specific knowledge from Caribbean Studies. As part of the dynamic team, the Postdoctoral Fellow in Caribbean Studies Data Curation will serve as the primary liaison for and provide consulting support to identify, store, describe (curate), retrieve, and re-use data for Caribbean Studies, particularly data not available in public or government repositories and especially for creating the attendant intellectual infrastructure through a mix of activities ad products (e.g., database entries in dLOC, webinars, teaching, supervising interns, policy development, procedure and workflow development and refinement).

The Postdoctoral Fellow will have the opportunity to lead new initiatives, including the new partnership with the UF Press for supporting enhanced monographs by hosting data sets, online exhibits, archival research materials, and other research files within dLOC as part of new scholarly publications. The Postdoctoral Fellow will serve as a core contact with the UF Press to implement services and workshops on data curation as part of creating enhanced monographs, journal articles, book chapters, and other publications with dLOC as the data repository.

The successful candidate will perform outreach and facilitate communication between the Libraries and Caribbean Studies research groups at UF as well as Caribbean Studies researchers and partners in dLOC. The Postdoctoral Fellow will pursue professional development opportunities, including research, publication, and professional service activities in accordance with the standards for library faculty; serve as a Principal Investigator (PI), co-PI or grant team member on externally funded projects; and engage in research and professional activity at the national and international level.

RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Contributes to university-wide initiatives to develop and design policies, services, and infrastructure to enable faculty and students to preserve and make available, and thus maximize the utility of, their research data.
  • Collaborates on the development and delivery of onsite and online/webinar trainings in Caribbean Studies data curation.
  • Collaborates on the development and teaching of for-credit courses, as applicable, in Caribbean Studies data curation.
  • Provides training for UF students, faculty, and staff and dLOC partners on data curation best practices and standards, and available UF and dLOC services.
  • Serves as a member of the UF-dLOC team to facilitate campus-wide data curation activities and initiatives; and, serve as a member of the dLOC team to facilitate data curation activities and initiatives across the dLOC community.
  • Works closely with the Digital Production Services and other entities (e.g. dLOC, other partners, other organizations) on relevant digitization projects.
  • Collaboratively supports decisions or recommendations on cataloging, location, preservation, maintenance, and retention of library resources and data for curation.
  • Formally assesses, through surveys, interviews, and focus groups, campus-wide and dLOC community data curation needs and current support resources and activities.
  • Works with library departments, technical experts, and the dLOC community to develop infrastructures and services that enhance access to Caribbean Studies data.
  • Partners with UF units and the dLOC community to implement Caribbean Studies data curation and publishing services and workshops.
  • Partners with the UF Press to implement services and workshops on data curation as part of creating enhanced monographs, journal articles, book chapters, and other publications with dLOC as the data repository.
  • Performs outreach using a variety of methods and tools to actively promote activities, events, and initiatives.
  • Serve as a core library consultant to UF and dLOC community faculty, researchers, and project teams as a collaborative team member for data curation throughout the research process.
  • Develops and maintains awareness of current tools and methodologies for computationally centered, data-driven research (data mining, visualization, text mining, etc.).
  • Develops and maintains awareness of emerging trends and best practices in Caribbean Studies, digital humanities, data curation, and e-scholarship in all disciplines.
  • Participates in appropriate professional organizations on the state, regional, national, and international levels and pursues professional development goals, including publication.

 QUALIFICATIONS

Required:

  • PhD in a relevant field
  • Fluency in English as well as Spanish and/or French
  • Ability to significantly contribute to the development and implementation of a vision for a Caribbean Studies data curation program
  • Ability to creatively develop, assess, and promote the use of library services, technologies, and collections
  • Excellent interpersonal skills including the ability to work effectively with individuals at all levels
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • Ability to initiate and manage collaborative projects including the development of policies
  • Strong interest in collaborating on grants
  • Strong interest in the development and delivery of training
  • Capacity to work creatively in a complex, rapidly changing academic environment and to respond with agility to changing needs and priorities
  • Instruction or teaching experience
  • Successful track record of collaboration regarding scholarly issues and/or technologies
  • Strong commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion

Preferred:

  • Successful track record in project development and management
  • Grant experience
  • Knowledge of funding agency requirements for data management plans
  • Professional experience with issues and technical challenges related to the life cycle of research data and digital curation
  • Demonstrated experience employing data curation and digital curation practices and technological applications to enhance library management and access
  • Experience with digital preservation standards and best practices and knowledge of repository platforms
  • Experience with web technologies
  • Experience with metadata issues related to the discovery of academic resources

GUIDANCE AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT

  • Regular meetings with supervisor
  • Regular team meetings with digital scholarship, data management, digital libraries, Latin American & Caribbean Collections, and the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC)
  • Introductions to national and international leaders through participation in conferences
  • Grants Management training and support from the UF Libraries’ Grants Manager
  • UF’s and the Libraries’ Professional Development opportunities
  • Support for development and delivery of training from the UF Libraries’ Instruction Consultant and Training Program Coordinator
  • Opportunities and support as part of the collaborative team on the campus-wide Data Management/Curation Working Group and the Digital Humanities Working Group
  • Opportunity for joint appointment with the Center for Latin American Studies and affiliate faculty with the UF Informatics Institute, each with additional grant and professional development opportunities

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

The University of Florida (UF) is a major, public, comprehensive, land-grant, research university. The state’s oldest and most comprehensive university, UF is among the nation’s most academically diverse public universities. UF has a long history of established programs in international education, research and service. It is one of only 17 public, land-grant universities that belong to the Association of American Universities. UF traces its beginnings to a small seminary in 1853 and is now one of the largest universities in the nation, with more than 50,000 students. For more information, please consult the UF homepage at http://www.ufl.edu. UF launched the UF Rising initiative in 2014 to bring UF to national preeminence with strategic hires and investments across the university. UF Rising’s largest single investment is in the new UF Informatics Institute, with other strategic investments in bioinformatics and other areas that leverage UF’s excellence for its diversity, complexity, and comprehensiveness. For more on UF Rising, see: http://rising.ufl.edu/.

GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES

The libraries of the University of Florida form the largest information resource system in the state of Florida. The UF Libraries consist of seven libraries; six are in the system known as the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. The libraries hold over 5,800,000 print volumes, 8,100,000 microfilms, 630,000 e-books, 121,016 full-text electronic journals, 889 electronic databases, 1,300,000 documents and 766,000 maps and images. The libraries have built a number of nationally significant research collections, including the Latin American & Caribbean, Judaica, Florida History, Children’s Literature, and Maps and Imagery Collections. The Smathers Libraries are a member of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the Center for Research Libraries (CRL), the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL), and LYRASIS. The library staff consists of more than 400 FTE librarians, technical/clerical staff and student assistants. The organizational chart is available at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/orgchart.pdf.

The UF Libraries have a long-standing history of excellence in digital curation with the UF Digital Collections along with collaborations across campus for digital humanities, digital scholarship, and data management and curation activities. For recent news, see: http://acrl.ala.org/dh/2014/07/23/intertwingularity-digital-humanities-university-florida/. The UF Libraries led creation of the campus-wide Data Management and Curation Task Force which started in 2012 (which became the Data Management and Curation Working Group in 2016) with representatives from the Libraries, Research Computing, and the Office of Research.

DIGITAL LIBRARY OF THE CARIBBEAN (dLOC)

UF is a founding partner and the technical host of the international Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC). Since creation in 2004, dLOC has into the largest open access collection of Caribbean materials with over 2 million pages of content, 42 institutional partners, and over 3 million views each month. dLOC is founded on a core of shared governance where all activities are governed by partner institutions with an equitable and partner-driven model where partners retain all rights to materials and determine all materials to contribute. dLOC partners commit to shared values for community and capacity development. Now in its second decade, dLOC focuses on digitization, digital curation for collection development, and skill and capacity development to support building intellectual infrastructure, teaching resources, integrated approaches to teaching, digital scholarship, and collaboration with scholars for new initiatives and programmatic supports. dLOC provides training and collaborates with partners to pursue new funding opportunities and initiatives, including data curation.

RESEARCH COMPUTING AND THE OFFICE OF RESEARCH

UF created Research Computing in 2011, with the vision to enable radical collaboration across campus. UF was the first university to fully connect to the Internet2 Innovation Platform’s three components. Research Computing is home to HiPerGator, the state’s most powerful supercomputer. For more on Research Computing, see: http://www.rc.ufl.edu/. In 2013, the Office of Research supported the over 5,000 funding awards for a total of over $640 million in sponsored research funding. For more, see: http://research.ufl.edu/.

COMMUNITY

Gainesville, Florida and the surrounding community are home to approximately 257,000 people and both the University of Florida and Santa Fe College. Situated just over an hour from the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean, the city is surrounded by over 40 nature parks, including many spring-fed lakes and rivers. In 2015, Gainesville was named the “Best Midsize College City in America” by WalletHub and ranked no. 7 on Livability.com “Top 10 College Towns”. Gainesville is known as an innovative municipal government and an innovative city. Gainesville continues to receive national recognition as a top-rated city. Some of Gainesville’s accolades are listed at the Gainesville Awards and Recognition link. The Guide to Greater Gainesville combines award winning photography and compelling articles that capture all of the reasons for calling Greater Gainesville your next home. The area has numerous cultural institutions and is a haven for sports fans. Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, Tallahassee, and St. Augustine are all within a two-hour drive.

BENEFITS

Vacation days, paid holidays, and sick leave days; retirement plan options; insurance benefits; tuition fee waiver program; no state or local income tax. Prospective employees should review the information about employment and benefits at UF available at http://hr.ufl.edu/benefits/.


[1] Caribbean Studies as defined by the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL) as “within the area of the Caribbean archipelago, the mainland countries including the Guianas, and the states of the United States which border on the Caribbean Sea or Gulf of Mexico” (https://goo.gl/DHSrxa).

Thank You. Merci.

I just wanted to take a few minutes to thank everyone who has accessed, shared, or used the World War I diary of my great-grandfather Albert Huet. Since February, it has been viewed more than 1,700 times. I can’t believe it. And neither can my grandfather, who is amazed that his dad’s story would be interesting to so many people.

In an effort to further enhance the project, I would now like to know how colleagues are using Albert Huet’s diary. I’m therefore requesting that anyone who has used the diary in her/his research or teaching to let me know (hhuet at ufl.edu) how it has helped you. I’m eager to learn about your experience and to link your projects/assignments/articles/books on my website.

Merci d’avance.