Tag Archives: digital humanities

2nd Annual Conference of the Florida Digital Humanities Consortium (FLDH). Deadline Extended.

The Florida Digital Humanities Consortium (FLDH) will host its 2nd annual conference at Flagler College in St. Augustine, FL on Friday, March 27, 2020. FLDH is a collective of institutions in the State of Florida that seeks to promote an understanding of the humanities in light of digital technologies and research. Founded in 2014, FLDH provides a platform for studying and discussing digital tools, methods, and pedagogies as well as educates teachers, faculty, and the public about the multiple, interdisciplinary ways humanities research and computing impact our world. Each year at the annual conference, FLDH members and guests meet to hear current research, discuss issues of interest, and set goals for future collaboration and digital humanities research.

The conference will last all day and include academic research and teaching presentations in the morning and early afternoon, followed by a THATCamp session and a plenary talk and dinner. FLDH seeks proposals for papers, posters, lightning rounds, roundtables, and panel presentations on any topic related to digital humanities. We welcome proposals not only from those in higher education, including students, faculty and staff, but also from cultural institutions and other organizations doing work in the digital humanities.

Individual abstracts of 200-250 words should be submitted for talks of 15 minutes.

A panel proposal of 150-250 words by the panel organizer(s) and individual abstracts for 3-5 papers can be submitted for panel presentations.

Posters, lightning rounds, and roundtables can be proposed with brief descriptions of 150 words. 

All proposals should include name, affiliation, contact email, and needed IT equipment.

The deadline for submissions has been extended to January 30, 2020.  


You can submit your proposals at https://ufl.libwizard.com/f/FLDH2020

2nd Annual Conference of the Florida Digital Humanities Consortium (FLDH)

The Florida Digital Humanities Consortium (FLDH) will host its 2nd annual conference at Flagler College in St. Augustine, FL on Friday, March 27, 2020. FLDH is a collective of institutions in the State of Florida that seeks to promote an understanding of the humanities in light of digital technologies and research. Founded in 2014, FLDH provides a platform for studying and discussing digital tools, methods, and pedagogies as well as educates teachers, faculty, and the public about the multiple, interdisciplinary ways humanities research and computing impact our world. Each year at the annual conference, FLDH members and guests meet to hear current research, discuss issues of interest, and set goals for future collaboration and digital humanities research.

The conference will last all day and include academic research and teaching presentations in the morning and early afternoon, followed by a THATCamp session and a plenary talk and dinner. FLDH seeks proposals for papers, posters, lightning rounds, roundtables, and panel presentations on any topic related to digital humanities. We welcome proposals not only from those in higher education, including students, faculty and staff, but also from cultural institutions and other organizations doing work in the digital humanities.

Individual abstracts of 200-250 words should be submitted for talks of 15 minutes.

A panel proposal of 150-250 words by the panel organizer(s) and individual abstracts for 3-5 papers can be submitted for panel presentations.

Posters, lightning rounds, and roundtables can be proposed with brief descriptions of 150 words. 

All proposals should include name, affiliation, contact email, and needed IT equipment.

The deadline for submissions is January 15, 2020.  


You can submit your proposals at https://ufl.libwizard.com/f/FLDH2020

New Publication Out in Digital Humanities Quarterly

An article I wrote with two of my UF colleagues, Suzan Alteri and Laurie N. Taylor, was published yesterday in the latest issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly. It is entitled: “Manifesto: A Life on the Hyphen: Balancing Identities as Librarians, Scholars, and Digital Practitioners.

The work of digital humanists and librarians is often invisible to the larger communities in which they work, particularly in academia. This opinion essay by three librarian-scholar-digital practitioners explores invisible work and life on the hyphen — between the academy and the library and between the human and the digital. In this essay, we illustrate how librarian-scholar-digital practitioners can feel overworked and underappreciated, working in and with multiple fields and communities who have different and sometimes competing methodologies. Through two examples, we look at how living on the hyphen takes its toll for librarian-scholar-digital practitioners. We end our essay by detailing steps faculty and administration can take to help us solve the problem and realize the promise of digital humanities.

ADHO 2020 CFP

ADHO 2020 CFP

The Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO) invites
contributions of proposals for its annual conference, Digital Humanities
2020: “Carrefours/Intersections”.
(http://dh2020.adho.org/guidelines/conference-details/#theme)


The conference will be held July 20-25, 2020 at Carleton University and the
University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Canada. Conference Submissions will be
welcomed from August 15- October 15, 2019. More details are available at
dh2020.adho.org.

The theme of the 2020 conference is “Carrefours/Intersections”, a place
where roads or streets meet. We specifically invite proposals that relate
to our sub-disciplinary conference interests
(http://dh2020.adho.org/guidelines/conference-details/#theme):
First Nations, Native American, and Indigenous Studies; public digital
humanities; and the open data movement. We welcome all who identify
themselves as working in the broad variety of disciplines, methodologies,
and pedagogies that the digital humanities encompasses.


Submissions may include:

   – Posters (http://dh2020.adho.org/guidelines/conference-details/#poster)
   (abstract 250-500 words)
   – Lightning talks
   (http://dh2020.adho.org/guidelines/conference-details/#lightning)
   (5 minutes; abstract 200-250 words)
   – Short presentations
   (http://dh2020.adho.org/guidelines/conference-details/#shortpresentations)
   (10 minutes; abstract 250-500 words)
   – Long presentations
   (http://dh2020.adho.org/guidelines/conference-details/#longpresentations)
   (20 minutes; abstract 750-1000 words)
   – Panels (http://dh2020.adho.org/guidelines/conference-details/#panels)
   (90 minutes; abstract 250 words + 300-500 word overview)
   – Forums (http://dh2020.adho.org/guidelines/conference-details/#forum)
   (90 minutes; abstract 500 words)
   – Pre-conference workshops and tutorials
   (http://dh2020.adho.org/guidelines/conference-details/#workshops-tutorials)
   (2 hours or 4 hours; 250-word overview plus syllabus and/or relevant existing
   tutorials)


Please consult the full call for proposals in your selected language:
Algonquin (http://dh2020.adho.org/cfps/cfp-anishinabeg/),
English (http://dh2020.adho.org/cfps/cfp-english/),
French (http://dh2020.adho.org/cfps/cfp-francais/),
Spanish (http://dh2020.adho.org/cfps/cfp-espanol/),
German (http://dh2020.adho.org/cfps/cfp-deutsch/),
Italian (http://dh2020.adho.org/cfps/cfp-italiano/)
for more details.


In addition, we welcome nominations for the following:

   – Keynote & Plenary Panelist Nominations
   (http://dh2020.adho.org/cfps/plenary-speaker-nomination/)
   – Conference Reviewers (http://dh2020.adho.org/cfps/reviewers/)


Questions related to this announcement should be directed to the DH2020
Program Chairs, Laura Estill and Jennifer Guiliano at pc2020@adho.org
Jennifer Guiliano <jenguiliano@gmail.com>

Inaugural FLDH Conference, March 2019

I am very excited to announce that the Florida Digital Humanities Consortium (FLDH) will be hosting its inaugural statewide conference at the University of North Florida (UNF) on March 29-30, 2019.

Friday, March 29, will be a formal research symposium, and Saturday, March 30, will follow a more spontaneous THATCamp format. The deadline for submissions to the Friday, March 29 portion of the conference is December 15, 2018. For more information and to submit a proposal, see https://www.unf.edu/dhi/Inaugural_FDLH_Conference.

 

Mapping Decadence Update: New Content Added

Hello everyone,
I finally found some time to update Mapping Decadence and I am pleased to say that I have added the following content to my website:

  • An introduction to my analysis of Huysmans, Lorrain, Rachilde and Schwob‘s maps.
  • Story Maps for each author. The last slide includes a link to the larger map in case people want to see a bigger version of it.  But my Story Maps are interactive, that is to say, the pop-ups can still be displayed.
  • A short bibliography.

Again, this is my interpretation, my analysis, and I am sure many will disagree or see something different in the maps, which is great. This is what makes scholarship so rich. My goal originally was to have the maps and the data available for anyone interested in Decadence and France so I hope this proves useful.

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age: Présentation du projet British Library, 16 mai, 2018, 11am-12pm (Miami Time).

carribean
Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age est une série de séminaires en ligne mettant en avant la recherche et l’enseignement numériques et publics des Etudes Caribéennes. Cette série fournit un environnement propice à la collaboration pour les professionnels et leur permet de partager leurs expériences, de discuter de leurs projets, cela afin de favoriser la communication et de soutenir les efforts de toutes et tous.
Notre prochain séminaire, Présentation du projet British Library, se déroulera le 16 mai 2018 de 11h du matin à midi (heure de Miami).
Présentatrice: Marie-France Guillaume
Cliquez ici pour participer à la session en ligne: https://ufl.zoom.us/j/8927374603
Présentation du projet British Library
La BHFIC est fondée en 1912, et est ouverte au public depuis 1920. Elle contient différents types de journaux, ce depuis le 19 siècle. Vu l’état des documents, l’idée était donc venue de les numériser afin de les sauvegarder, et souvent la BHFIC est la seule institution à posséder ces journaux.
Ainsi, en avril 2014, en partenariat avec dLOC, la BHFIC a commencé avec le travail de numérisation. En mai 2017, nous avons reçu un don de la British Library dans le cadre du programme « Endangerd Archives ». Ce qui fait que maintenant nous disposons de deux appareils de numérisation, ainsi que de deux techniciens pour faire le travail. La subvention de British Library couvre les journaux du 19e siècle et c’est un contrat qui s’étend sur deux années, incluant le salaire des deux techniciens ainsi qu’un abonnement internet.
En janvier 2018, nous avons remis à la British Library un disque dur d’1 TO contenant les documents déjà numérisés. Un autre a été donné en mars avec la suite. Le travail continue et avec l’assistance de dLOC quand le besoin se fait sentir.
Nous espérons à travers ce travail, dans la mesure où nous trouvons de l’aide, passer à la mise en ligne de la BHFIC, car nous voulons rendre les documents disponibles pour le monde entier. Les numériser c’est la première étape, mais c’est aussi important qu’ils soient disponibles sur internet pour la formation d’un plus grand nombre.
Biographie : Marie-France Guillaume
Je travaille à la BHFIC depuis septembre 2012 à titre de Directrice Exécutive. Après des études en informatique, et des séminaires en numérisation à FIU, je suis actuellement étudiante en Sciences Juridiques. Depuis mon arrivée à BHFIC, mon grand souci c’était d’essayer de sauvegarder les documents qui sont souvent en très mauvais état étant donné leur ancienneté. Grâce à dLOC, à Fokal et maintenant avec British Library, ce projet voit le jour. De 2014 à nos jours nous avons numérisé plus de 20.000 pages de journaux. Jusqu’à la subvention de British Library, nous avions un seul technicien, maintenant nous en avons deux et le travail va plus rapidement.
A propos de la série de séminaires en ligne Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age:
La Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), en partenariat avec le Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida, Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), la Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, la Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) de la Société des Archivistes Américains (SAA), et le Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), a organisé Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, une série de séminaires en ligne mettant en avant la recherche et l’enseignement numériques et publics des Etudes Caribéennes. Cette série fournit un environnement propice à la collaboration pour les professionnels et leur permet de partager leurs expériences, de discuter de leurs projets, cela afin de favoriser la communication et de soutenir les efforts de toutes et tous.
Les séminaires de la série en 2018 sont les suivants:

Continuez la discussion lors de la conférence annuelle d’ACURIL en 2018, dont le thème est Accès Ouvert : http://acuril2018republicadominicana.com/
Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age: Ramble Bahamas, May 7, 2018, 11am-12pm (Miami Time).

carribean
Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.
Please join us for an upcoming event, Ramble Bahamas, May 7, 2018, 11am-12pm (Miami Time).
Presenters: Dr. Tracey Thompson and Jessica Dawson, University of The Bahamas
Click here to participate in the online event: https://ufl.zoom.us/j/8927374603
About the Presentation:
2017 marked the fiftieth anniversary of a watershed in Bahamian political life: the advent of majority rule. So as to pay tribute to that anniversary in an appealing and enduring way, “From Dat Time”: The Oral & Public History Institute of the University of The Bahamas (“FDT”) launched an ambitious venture in the field of digital humanities. The “FDT” team, guided by the Institute’s mandate to develop curricular and recreational materials in a variety of media, committed itself to fashioning a digital heritage trail through which Bahamian students could retrace important steps in the Bahamian political story. The team went further: it envisioned building a platform that could serve as a publication engine for all research undertaken by the Institute. Such a platform, so the team judged, would augment limited scholarly publication in the field of Bahamian political history. It would widen access to historical literature among students and educators located throughout the far-flung Bahamian archipelago. It would draw on the Institute’s strength as a vehicle devoted to collecting and preserving oral narratives of community elders, many of whom had played significant roles in social, educational, and political transformations in the mid-1900s. It would press into service a media archive consisting of rare photos and film from the 1960s and 1970s – images long hidden from public view. The result of the team’s investment was Ramble Bahamas. Utilizing the Omeka content management system and the Curatescape framework, Ramble Bahamas presents geographically-tagged exhibits about historically significant places and objects in The Bahamas. Each exhibit is comprised of a narrative outlining the importance of the location or object, relevant historic and contemporary images, and oral history audio or video clips in which informed narrators speak of events associated with the location or object. Since its launch in November 2016, Ramble Bahamas has been introduced to students at the University of The Bahamas and to high school teachers of History and Geography. Plans are under way to integrate the platform into national curricula in History so as to advance the nation-building mandate of the university.
About the Speakers:
Tracey Thompson, PhD: As Director of “From Dat Time”: The Oral & Public History Institute of the University of The Bahamas, Tracey Thompson oversees the research programme and administrative processes of the institute. Tracey has been involved in research, teaching, and administration at the University of The Bahamas for more than twenty-five years. Her research foci lie principally in African and African Diaspora History, in Philosophy of History, in Oral History, and in Public History.
Jessica Dawson, MA: In her capacity as Public History Fellow in Research & Technology for “From Dat Time”: The Oral & Public History Institute of the University of The Bahamas, Jessica Dawson acted as webmaster and curator for Ramble Bahamas. Prior to this, she taught tertiary courses in the field of cultural anthropology and worked in historic preservation. She holds a B.A. in Anthropology from Washington State University and an M.A. in American Studies & Public History from Youngstown State University.
About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:
The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida, Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA)of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.
Webinars in the 2018 series are:

Please join us for next stage conversations at ACURIL’s 2018 annual conference, focusing on Open Access in Caribbean Libraries, Archives and Museums: Opportunities, Challenges and Future Directions http://acuril2018republicadominicana.com/
Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age: New Webinars

carribean
Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.
Please join us for an upcoming event, Digitization Training for dLOC Partners, April 2, 2018, 11:30am-12:30pm (Miami Time). Presenter: Laura Perry
Click here to participate in the online event: https://zoom.us/j/3982941835
About the Presentation:
The Digitization Training for dLOC contributors will provide a broad overview of the digitization process. At the end of this webinar, users will have a better understanding of metadata creation, digitization using a flatbed scanner, dSLR camera set-up, file editing and naming, folder structure, serial hierarchy creation and file delivery.
About the Speaker:
Laura Perry, Manager of Digital Production Services. Laura manages the team that conducts digitization and ingests content into the UF Digital Collections (UFDC) and the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC).  She serves as a resource for providing information on best practices for digitization and digital preservation.
About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:
The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida, Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.
Webinars in the 2018 series are:

  • April 2, 11:30-12:30pm: Digitization Training for dLOC Contributors (English)
    • Presented by Laura Perry, University of Florida
  • April 9, 11am-12pm: Demystifying Digital History (English)
    • Presented by Dr. Debbie McCollin, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad
  • May 7, 11am-12pm: Ramble Bahamas (English)
    • Presented by Dr. Tracey Thompson and Jessica Dawson, University of The Bahamas (Facilitator: Crystal Felima)
  • May 16, 11am-12pm: Présentation du projet British Library (French)
    • Presenter: Marie-France Guillaume, Bibliothèque Haïtienne des Frères de l’Instruction Chrétienne (Facilitator: Dr. Hélène Huet)

Please join us for next stage conversations at ACURIL’s 2018 annual conference, focusing on Interdisciplinary Research in the Caribbean: http://libguides.uwi.edu/acurilconference2018
Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship