Digital Humanities Study Abroad, UF in Trinidad and Tobago

UF Digital Humanities & Public History Study Abroad in Trinidad & Tobago

The deadline to apply for UF in Trinidad and Tobago, a new and unique study abroad opportunity during Summer B, is little more than a week away—March 15.

UF in Trinidad and Tobago is designed to immerse students in the history and cultures of Trinidad and the broader Caribbean through oral history fieldwork and digital humanities production. Major themes of the course are religion, Trinidadian literature, anti-slavery and anti-colonial movements, oral history, historical memory, and public history. Excursions include Nelson Island, the island of Tobago, key heritage and eco-tourist sites, beaches, and more.

Dr. Ortiz, the lead faculty instructor and director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, is very excited to bring students to Trinidad and Tobago for a fun, immersive, and hands-on learning experience.

Students will earn six history credits at the 4,000-level through the program. Visit the link below to apply. Please send any application or program questions to or


THATCamp-News, University of Florida, April 17, 2018


Over the past several years, UF has collaborated with others in Gainesville to host a THATCamp-Gainesville event. “THATCamp” is The Humanities And Technology Camp, and it is an unconference: an open, inexpensive meeting where humanists, technologists, educators, archivists, and folks from many different backgrounds and fields come together to learn together, and to make connections for future collaborations. We have changed the format for THATCamp-Gainesville over the years in terms of duration, location, and structure. THATCamp-Gainesville also began as a different event, Digital Humanities Day.

THATCamp is an opportunity for anyone  in the UF and Gainesville communities with an interest in culture and digital technologies to come together, share their work, and learn new skills for building and analyzing digital projects across the humanities.  It is also a chance to build connections between digital humanities projects across North Florida.  And, if you don’t know what the ‘digital humanities’ are, then come find out. Please visit the conference website to register, suggest a session proposal, comment on the session proposals made by others, and generally learn more about this event.

This year the format of THATCamp has evolved. Organizers hope that THATCamp will become a thematic event connected to and cross-promoting another conference. THATCamp-News will be 9:30am-12pm on 17 April (Tuesday), the morning before the IFLA International News Media Conference, a separate event which THATCamp-News participants are encouraged to also engage with.


  • 9:15-9:30am: Registration, Welcome and opening remarks
  • 9:30-10:30am: Lightning talks (6-7 minutes each)
    • #NoLaIBCita
    • #NoNazisAtUF organizers
    • Patrick Daglaris: Digital preservation through oral history.
    • April Hines on methods/uses of UF’s digital newspaper databases by students, challenges, barriers, usability, etc.
    • Melissa Jerome: Digitization of the Alligator
    • Patrick Reakes on the implications of copyright on news digitization
  • 10:30-11am: Breakout discussion
  • 11am-11:15am: Break
  • 11:15am-12pm: TEI Workshop, with Dr. Megan Daly
  • 12pm: Event ends. Time is open for lunch in groups, find friends and meetup!

All presenters will share on topics related to news and preservation. We expect several presentations to be on digital/digitization of newspaper projects, including on research using digitized news.

  • To register, visit:
  • Questions about THATCamp in general for the formats and varieties? See the main site and post questions on the THATCamp forums and someone from the community will reply within a couple of days.
  • This event is free and open to members of the public who work in cultural heritage institutions or the technology sector.
  • THATCamp Gainesville is organized by a planning committee of the UF Digital Humanities Working Group (DHWG), a group of academic and library faculty, staff, and graduate students who meet monthly to discuss current topics at the intersection of digital technologies and the humanities and support each other in project development. For more information on the Digital Humanities at UF and to join the DHWG, visit

Digital Resource Showcase @UF 3/16

Do you want to ace your paper? Impress your friends? Improve your chances of finding a job? Join us for UF Libraries’ Digital Resources Showcase on March 16th!

The showcase brings librarians and students together to highlight steps for finding the best research online and organizing your work quickly, plus the One Button Studio, 3-D printing, video streaming access, digital newspapers, maps and mapping tools, institutional repository and digital archival collections and more. If doing your coursework feels more daunting than going to the Upside Down, then this event is for you.

And did we mention we’ll provide free snacks and giveaways?

Join us on the Colonnade outside Library West from 1-3pm (Library West 212 if there’s rain) to learn how to take your work to Eleven.

DigitalGetdown_2018_flyer image

Digital Scholarship at UF Workshop: Videos Now Available Online

If you missed our livestream or could not attend the Digital Scholarship at UF Workshop on February 2, 2018, rejoice because the videos of the different sessions are now available online in UFDC.

3D Data Acquisition and Dissemination

3D Printing and Augmented Reality with Aurasma

Best Practices for Project Management & Collaboration

CFP: European Studies Research Forum American Library Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, June 21-26, 2018

CFP: European Studies Research Forum
American Library Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, June 21-26, 2018

The ACRL European Studies Section will host its annual European Studies Research Forum at the ALA annual conference in New Orleans on Sunday, June 24th, from 8:30 to 10:00 a.m.

The ESS Research and Planning Committee invites proposals for presentations on research, including digital projects, related to any part or language of Europe. Topics do not need to be library-related.

The committee will consider proposals on research in-progress or recently completed projects.

Proposals must include:

  • Name and brief bio of the presenter(s)
  • Tentative title and 200-word abstract

The committee will evaluate the proposals based on the clarity of the topic and quality of the abstract.

Presentations will be limited to 15 minutes each for 3 presentations, followed by time for questions. The forum will offer the presenters an opportunity to discuss their research in an informal setting.

Please submit your proposal via email to the chair of the ESS Research and Planning Committee, Ms. Téa Rokolj ( The deadline for proposal submissions is March 31st.

The proposals will be reviewed by the members of the committee who will choose 3 proposals for the forum.  All persons who submit a proposal will be contacted soon after the committee makes its decision by mid-April at the latest.

FSU Digital Humanities Graduate Program – deadline March 30, 2018; tuition waiver and stipend


What is digital humanities?

Digital humanities embraces a wide variety of activities that, in different ways, bring together data science, computing, data curation, and humanistic study. Work in the digital humanities can range from digital exhibitions in museums and libraries, to the work of scholars using computers to analyze literature and art, to study of and engagement with social media and social networks, to the practice of digital publication and media.

Why should I pursue a degree in digital humanities?

Students of digital humanities can apply their skills and expertise in universities and cultural heritage institutions or in a variety of roles in non-profit or private industry which require a combination of both traditional “soft” skills in the liberal arts and the digital skills of the 21st century. Though some students will come to digital humanities as a way to prepare for pursuing a Ph.D. in a discipline and in order to do research specifically in digital humanities, others will find digital humanities a pathway to humanistic careers well beyond the academy. Students will find in digital humanities the tools for engaging with humanities in a new and different way than they had before.

What is the Master’s degree program like?

FSU’s digital humanities MA degree is a 2-year degree hosted in the Program in Interdisciplinary Humanities. The program is highly flexible and individualized to suit each student’s chosen specialty within the large field of possibilities open to digital humanists. There are a series of core classes where students learn essential digital humanities skills for data analytics (DH 1: Humanities Data), data curation (DH 2), and for communicating and teaching (Digital Pedagogy). Students are also part of a growing and vibrant community of digital humanities scholars across many departments and schools of the university, including the Office of Digital Research in the University Libraries and the Digital Scholars group sponsored by the History of Text Technology Program in the Department of English. Beginning in 2018, PIH will host its own digital humanities workshop series. A collaborative digital humanities lab will start work in the coming year as well.

How much does it cost?

All students in the program are fully funded. Students are provided with a full stipend (13K +) and tuition waiver in exchange for service as teaching assistants and, in the second year of study, as instructors of record for an undergraduate course.


For more information, contact the director of the graduate program, Dr. Allen Romano, at

Information can also be found on the website,, under “Program”

To Apply:


The program in digital humanities is open to students from all majors, including especially all humanities disciplines, library or information studies, and any computing disciplines.

Applications require a statement of purpose, 3 letters of recommendation, and a sample of written or (if applicable) digital work.

Application deadline is March 31, 2018.

Graduate Student Research Series at UF Spring 2018

Could you use a little help with your research? With finding better scholarly sources and building scholarly knowledge? With preparing a research poster? With becoming a good academic writer?

UF Librarians Hélène Huet (European Studies), David Schwieder (Political Science), and Neelam Bharti (Chemistry), and UF Writing Instructor Sean Trainor, will present a series of research-focused sessions to help graduate students with the following topics:

Thursday February 8         Session 1: Finding Scholarly Sources

Thursday February 15       Session 2: Building Scholarly Knowledge

Thursday February 22       Session 3: Designing and Preparing a Research Poster

Thursday March 1             Session 4: Writing for All: How Thinking Like a Journalist Can Make You a Better Academic Writer

All sessions Period 4 10:40-11:30 a.m.
Room 212 Library West (Scott Nygren Studio)
No registration required
All UF Graduate and Professional Students Are Welcome