Call for applications: “Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute,” a 2019-2020 NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Apply for the Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute 

Applications are due by February 1, 2019

Thanks to generous funding from the NEH, the Institute is pleased to be able to cover travel costs and offer a small stipend for participants. Participation includes 5 phases, with required attendance at the in-person session (May 20-24, 2019) and for virtual sessions (July-December 2019), along with creation of teaching materials (January-August 2020). Please see For Participants for more information on the Institute phases and funding.

Call for Applications

Call for Applications: “Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute,” a 2019-2020 NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Deadline: Applications are due Friday, February 1, 2019

Application Information: http://dloc.com/teach/apply

Partners in the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) are pleased to invite applications to an NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities entitled “Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute.” This Institute is designed for anyone who teaches or supports Caribbean Studies courses or sections dealing with Caribbean Studies in courses. This Institute is also aimed at people who are interested in learning ways to utilize digital collections and implement digital tools and methods into their teaching and collaborative practices. We seek participants who are looking to create new resources for teaching Caribbean Studies in multiple fields and varying types of institutions, as well as enhance the community of practice for engaging with DH. We welcome applications from professors, instructors, graduate students, and library faculty and staff.

Participants will gain DH teaching experience and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools (Scalar, TimelineJS, StoryMapJS, Mapping), processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty-six participants will acquire concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections. Through participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH, they will also learn to create Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies.

Program:

Comprised of introductory readings, a week-long in-person session (held May 20-24, 2019 at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida), and virtual sessions and online communication in the year following through August 2020, the Institute is structured to give participants the time and space to learn new approaches as well as integrate them into research and teaching. The overall goals of the Institute include gaining expertise in digital tools, with digital collections, and as part of a community of practice. Over the course of the program, participants will be supported in collaborating together and in developing teaching materials to be shared as Open Access.

See the Institute website for a more detailed schedule: http://dloc.com/teach/schedule

Institute Directors and Faculty:

Please see the Institute website for details on the directors and faculty: http://dloc.com/teach/faculty

Application Details:

The Institute will select 26 participants who regularly teach Caribbean Studies courses or sections dealing with Caribbean Studies in courses in related fields (e.g., history, literature, cultural studies, Black Studies, Global Studies). The classes can be at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and instructors, librarians, staff, and graduate students can apply. As we mentioned earlier, we are interested in recruiting participants who are looking to create new resources for teaching Caribbean Studies in multiple fields and varying types of institutions, as well as enhance the community of practice for engaging with DH.

Please see the Institute website for more details about stipends and conditions of award for participants: http://dloc.com/l/teach/forparticipants

Application to the Institute should include:

  • An up-to-date CV (short version, preferred).
  • A statement of interest (1-2 pages) that provides:
    • description of current teaching assignments and responsibilities
  • Optional:
    • description of a course, proposed course, or sample syllabus that engages with the Caribbean through the themes of migration, mobility, or sustainability.

Please send materials by February 1, 2019 to laurien@ufl.edu.

Applications will be reviewed by the selection committee (Taylor, Huet, Ortiz, Rosenberg, Asencio, and Felima).

The team will notify participants of acceptance by March 15, 2019.

The Institute’s priority will be to select a diverse mix of participants from institutions across the US, including specifically recruiting from Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, HBCUs, and HSIs given the rich collections, communities, and teaching connections related to Caribbean Studies. Priority also will be given to select participants from various humanities fields. Additionally, while Florida is the third most populous state, Caribbean Studies spans the whole of the US as a home to the diaspora. For those selected from Florida, priority will be given to those from institutions not represented on the project team.

More Information and Questions:

Please see the Institute website (http://dloc.com/l/teach/dhinstitute) for further details. Questions may be directed to laurien@ufl.edu

Final Acceptance

For final acceptance starting in March, participants will confirm:

  1. Attendance for the in-person Institute and virtual sessions
  2. That by June 2020 they will submit two DH assignments, developed by taking part in the Institute, for inclusion in dLOC’s Teaching Guides & Materials Collection for use by others. As with all materials in dLOC, participants retain all rights and may elect to share their materials via other repositories and websites.

Please contact the project director, Laurie Taylor, with any questions: laurien@ufl.edu

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This Institute has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this Institute, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

 

New Book Chapter is Out: Improving Graduate Students’ Research Skills

Hello everyone. I am pleased to announce that my book chapter “Improving Graduate Students’ Research Skills: The Graduate Student Research Series at the University of Florida.” is out in the book Transforming Libraries to Serve Graduate Students.

Interested in buying the book? You can find it here: https://www.alastore.ala.org/content/transforming-libraries-serve-graduate-students.

Thanks to the editors Crystal Renfro and Cheryl Stiles for their hard work.

Inaugural FLDH Conference, March 2019

I am very excited to announce that the Florida Digital Humanities Consortium (FLDH) will be hosting its inaugural statewide conference at the University of North Florida (UNF) on March 29-30, 2019.

Friday, March 29, will be a formal research symposium, and Saturday, March 30, will follow a more spontaneous THATCamp format. The deadline for submissions to the Friday, March 29 portion of the conference is December 15, 2018. For more information and to submit a proposal, see https://www.unf.edu/dhi/Inaugural_FDLH_Conference.

 

Graduate Student Research Series – Fall 2018

Image of the poster for the Graduate STudent Research Series for Fall 2018

Fall 2018
Graduate Student Research Series

Could you use a little help with your research? With finding and synthesizing scholarly materials? With becoming an expert in your field? With editing and polishing your works as well as becoming a more effective academic writer?

UF Librarians Hélène Huet (European Studies), David Schwieder (Political Science), and Megan Daly (Classics, Philosophy, and Religion), and UF Professional Writing Professor Sean Trainor, will present a series of research-focused sessions to help graduate students with the following topics:

Wednesday October 3         Session 1: Finding Scholarly Materials for Your Research
Wednesday October 10       Session 2: Synthesizing Scholarly Materials and Becoming an Expert in Your Field
Wednesday October 17       Session 3: Becoming a Versatile, Effective Academic Writer
Wednesday October 24       Session 4: Editing and Polishing Abstracts, Papers, and Articles for Submission

All sessions are Period 4 10:40-11:30 a.m.
Room 212 Library West (Scott Nygren Studio)
No registration required
All UF Graduate and Professional Students Are Welcome

Session 1: Finding Scholarly Materials for Your Research

In this session, you will learn how to navigate the library’s website in order to find the books, articles, videos, and other materials needed for your research. You will also learn about various library and on-campus resources that will be of help during your academic career at the University of Florida

Session 2: Synthesizing Scholarly Materials and Becoming an Expert in Your Field

The heart of a graduate school education involves becoming an expert in your field. This session draws on cognitive and social psychology literatures to offer practical approaches designed to help you synthesize your voluminous graduate school reading load and effectively and efficiently develop subject field expertise.

Session 3: Becoming a Versatile, Effective Academic Writer

In this session, you will learn:

–           Four simple techniques you can adopt to enhance your academic writing, and;
–           Why writing like a journalist can make you a better scholarly writer.

Dr. Sean Trainor will lead the session. Dr. Trainor is a professor of professional writing at the University of Florida and a freelance writer.

Session 4: Editing and Polishing Abstracts, Papers, and Articles for Submission

How do you edit an abstract so it’s less than 300 words but still effectively communicates your ideas? How can you polish your conference paper so it reads well in front of a live audience? How can you perfect a draft of an article to make it clear, scholarly, and professional? This session offers tips on how to put the finishing touches on your work so you can put your best foot forward.

 

 

 

Finding French and Francophone Special Collections

Many institutions in the United States and Canada have very strong French and Francophone collections. In 2017, CRL’s Collaborative Initiative for French Language Collections (CIFNAL) Collection Development Working Group had the pleasure to work with an intern from ENSSIB, who created a database and map of these collections. The database and the map are now featured on this website: https://cifnalcollections.wordpress.com/

Click on the Collections menu to see a list of collections with detailed descriptions in English. Click on the Map menu to visualize the locations of the many institutions represented in the database.

We are grateful to Anne-Charlotte Pivot for her fast and professional work on this project. Anne-Charlotte also prepared a detailed explanation of the rationale behind the project and how to best use the database, explanation which is available in both English and French.

The CIFNAL Collection Development Working Group has also created and is sustaining a LibGuide that compiles a number of French and Francophone Digital Humanities projects from around the world. You can suggest new projects if you see one that is missing!

Passport to Great Teaching at the University of Florida

The Office of Faculty Development & Teaching Excellence is kicking off a new certificate program this fall called Passport to Great Teaching! Earn “travel miles” by participating in workshops, conferences, faculty learning communities and much more. Receive badges after traveling 400 miles in a specific category. Get your Great Teaching for New Faculty Certificate or your Great Teaching Certificate after traveling 1,000 miles. Check out the September offerings in the attached newsletter.

The Passport to Great teaching includes a Faculty Learning Community track for folks interested in a deep dive into a specific topic.

To learn more and register for one of the Faculty Learning Communities please visit the FLC registration webpage. Current Communities are:

  • Creative Assessment: Facilitated by Dr. Tim Brophy
  • Experiential Learning: Facilitated by Dr. Crystal Marull and Dr. Pamela Dickrell
  • Digital Literacy: Facilitated by Dr. Sid Dobrin

Check out some of our resources on the new Teach.ufl.edu website such as the Resource Library, recent episodes of the Beyond the Podium Podcast  and Magna Campus which includes a full subscription to Faculty Focus.

Getting to Know Your Library West Librarians

Last week, we launched a series of profile videos so you can get to know the amazing librarians who work at Library West at the University of Florida. Library West is the Humanities and Social Sciences library at UF. The videos were filmed during the Summer 2017 semester and were completed thanks to a Smathers Graduate Internship in Public Relations (see proposal). The goal with these videos is to show students and faculty that librarians are approachable as well as highlight how librarians can help patrons with their research needs and more (academic job market, instruction, etc…).

My video is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1tSE51W_oo&index=6&list=PLm1EZOX-MZAV29cvdiIZbLytzv6J3elfj&t=0s . 

If you are interested in watching all the videos, the playlist is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1tSE51W_oo&index=6&list=PLm1EZOX-MZAV29cvdiIZbLytzv6J3elfj&t=0s

Image including different thumbnails from each librarian's videos.

George A. Smathers Libraries in partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean Receive $231,093 National Endowment for the Humanities Grant Award

In partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean, University of Florida researchers led a collaborative project, which has been awarded $231,093 to host a week-long, in-person workshop and five additional monthly virtual workshops on collaborative Digital Humanities (DH) and Caribbean Studies. The project is entitled Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Advanced Institute. The lead researchers will open a call in October to select participants for the program. Participants will gain DH teaching experience and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools, processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty-six participants will achieve: 1) acquisition of concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections; 2) participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH; and, 3) creation of Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies.

Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Advanced Institute is the most recent of ongoing initiatives by UF and the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) for building capacity and community for Caribbean digital libraries, from digitization for access and preservation, to building upon digitized materials for research and teaching. The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) is a cooperative digital library for resources from and about the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean. The dLOC partner institutions are the core of dLOC. dLOC partners retain all rights to their materials and provide access to digitized versions of Caribbean cultural, historical and research materials currently held in archives, libraries, and private collections. This is the first Advanced Institute with UF and dLOC, and it will enable greater engagement with more community members on critical needs and opportunities in the digital age for research and teaching.

Laurie Taylor, PhD, UF’s digital scholarship librarian and the dLOC’s digital scholarship director, is the lead investigator, and is collaborating with the co-principal investigators, Hélène Huet, PhD, European studies librarian; Paul Ortiz, PhD, Director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program in the Department of History; and  Leah Rosenberg, PhD, professor of Caribbean Literature in the Department of English.

WWI Diary of Albert Huet: New Features

I have been redesigning the “WWI Diary of Albert Huet” project for the past few weeks and I am happy to announce the following new features:

  • A biography in English of Albert and some information about the project and the diary.
  • Information about the translation project that was led by Dr. Lynn E. Palermo from Susquehanna University and completed in June 2018.
  • The diary which now features for each page: the image, the transcription, the standardized French text, and the English translation. Users can easily navigate from tab to tab. Each image is linked to the original file in the University of Florida’s Digital Collections. At the bottom of each page, you can find links to the previous and next pages of the diary. There is also now a list of all the pages of the diary, should users want to navigate to a very specific page.
  • The additional documents related to Albert’s life in the army now feature two photos taken by my aunt of Albert’s two “croix de guerre”.

My goal was to make the diary more useful to scholars, students, and the broader public in general. I am so thankful to my family for letting me digitize all of these documents and sharing them with the world.

Mapping Decadence Update: New Content Added

Hello everyone,
I finally found some time to update Mapping Decadence and I am pleased to say that I have added the following content to my website:

  • An introduction to my analysis of Huysmans, Lorrain, Rachilde and Schwob‘s maps.
  • Story Maps for each author. The last slide includes a link to the larger map in case people want to see a bigger version of it.  But my Story Maps are interactive, that is to say, the pop-ups can still be displayed.
  • A short bibliography.

Again, this is my interpretation, my analysis, and I am sure many will disagree or see something different in the maps, which is great. This is what makes scholarship so rich. My goal originally was to have the maps and the data available for anyone interested in Decadence and France so I hope this proves useful.