digital scholarship

Symposium, Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean, Sept. 21-22, 2017 University of Florida

Please save the date for the upcoming symposium:

Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean

Date: September 21 and 22

Locations: Smathers Library, room 100

The full event information is online (http://digitalhumanities.group.ufl.edu/event/collaborating-across-the-divide-digital-humanities-and-globalization-sept-21-23-2017/).

We hope that you can join for the symposium, and we look forward to the event as a place for conversation on next steps in regional collaboration!   Please share on any questions, and please share this with others!

================

About the Symposium:

Digital technology has made the early twenty-first century a critical moment of opportunity by providing access to a wide range of library and archival materials and by offering new means of teaching, analyzing content, and presenting literary scholarship. While digital technologies have the promise of bridging institutional and geographic barriers, they have also continued to reproduce colonial hierarchies and marginalize content from the Caribbean and the Global South. This symposium, “Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean,” brings together scholars and artists from the Caribbean and the United States to discuss how to collaborate through digital humanities in ways that decolonize knowledge and empower Caribbean subjects, rather than reaffirm colonial histories of archiving and education.  The project will center on the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com), an international partnership whose technological and DH hub is the University of Florida. The objective of the symposium is to produce an action plan for making dLOC a hub for pedagogical, scholarly, and artistic collaboration.

Schedule:

Thursday, 21 Sept., 5-6:45pm:

  • Introduction and Presentation: Oonya Kempadoo

Friday, 22 Sept.:

  • 9-10:45am: Panel: “DH and Non-DH Collaboration within the Academy,” Rosamond King and Matthew Smith
  • 10:45-11am: Break
  • 11am-12:45pm: Panel: “Public Humanities and DH Collaboration: Pedagogy beyond Academia,” Gabriele Hosein and Schuyler Esprit
  • 12:45-2:15pm: Lunch Break
  • 2:15-3:15pm: Platforms for Caribbean DH: Thomas Hale and others
  • 3:15-3:30pm: Break
  • 3:30-5pm, Roundtable:
  • 5-5:15pm: Closing remarks

Speakers:

OONYA KEMPADOO is author of Buxton Spice (1997), winner of the Tide Running (2001), and All Decent Animals (2013); winner of the Casa de Las Americas Prize (2002), and consultant in the arts and social development, including work with UNICEF, UNAID. She was Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence and Creative Writing Instructor (2013-2014) at two colleges in Connecticut; and serves advisor to Caribbean literacy non-profit “Hands Across the Sea” and co-founder of the Grenada Community Library & Resource Center in St George’s Grenada. An internationally acclaimed novelist, she is a leader in digital arts and educational collaboration in the Caribbean. Kempadoo has initiated two digital projects to support environmental sustainability in the Caribbean. The first, Naniki, is a speculative fiction, multi-media, eco-social project designed to engage students in the Caribbean and other countries in using digital technology and supporting environmental sustainability. The second, Carisealand, is a digital platform for scholars, artists, and the public for sharing projects on sustainability, designed and built by Create Caribbean Research Institute and it’s students (Dominica State College).

SCHUYLER ESPRIT is a scholar of Caribbean literature and cultural studies. Dr. Esprit holds a PhD in English literature from University of Maryland – College Park. She currently serves as dean of Academic Affairs at Dominica State College as well as director of the Create Caribbean Research Institute. She has pioneered Digital Humanities projects and digital technology training at the K-12 and College level in Dominica as well as collaboratively, linking classes at the Dominica State College and classes at colleges in the United States. She is now completing her book manuscript and its digital companion, both entitled Occasions for Caribbean Reading, a historical exploration of reading culture in the Caribbean.

GABRIELLE HOSEIN, Director of the Institute for Gender & Development Studies, at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad), which is home to several significant digital and public humanities projects, including Caribbean Review of Gender Studies, an open access peer-reviewed journal, of which Hosein is associate editor. Hosein is Principle Investigator for Politics, Power and Gender Justice in the Anglophone Caribbean, 2011-2014, member of the research team for the project Building Responsive Policy: Gender, Sexual Cultures and HIV & AIDS in the Caribbean, 2008-2011, and co-editor of Indo-Caribbean Feminist Thought Genealogies, Theories, Enactments (Palgrave 2016).

MATTHEW J. SMITH is Professor in History and Head, Department of History and Archaeology, The UWI, Mona. His areas of research include Haitian politics, society, and migration. He is the author of the books Liberty, Fraternity, Exile: Haiti and Jamaica After Emancipation (University of North Carolina Press, 2014), winner of the Haiti Illumination Project Book Prize from the Haitian Studies Association and Red and Black in Haiti: Radicalism, Conflict, and Political Change, 1934-1957 (University of North Carolina Press, 2009) which was a winner of the Gordon K and Sybil Lewis prize for best book in Caribbean History from the Caribbean Studies Association. He had contributed significantly to dLOC’s teacher training program and to its edited collection Haiti: An Island Luminous; his service work utilizes the digital for critical needs, including as Director of UWI-Mona’s Haiti Initiative following the 2010 earthquake providing assistance to Haitian university students and the Haitian national library, his work serving as Director of the UWI’s Social History Project, and as member of the Board of Museums and Archives of the Institute of Jamaica.

ROSAMOND KING (Associate Professor of English, Brooklyn College, CUNY) is a critical and creative writer and artist, whose work focuses on the Caribbean and sexuality. Her book Island Bodies: Transgressive Sexualities in the Caribbean Imagination won the 2015 Caribbean Studies Association Gordon K. and Sybil Lewis Prize for the best Caribbean Studies Book. She is also a poet, artist, and performer with an extensive record of publications and performances. She is also a leader in digitizing LBGTQ archival materials from the Caribbean for dLOC and has collaboratively developed and taught with Dr. Angelique Nixon, a distributed online collaborative course (DOCC) in the US and Caribbean on sexualities.

THOMAS HALE was one of the founders of the African Literature Association, a field of study that developed in the early 1970s. Two of his early books reflect this initiative: The Teaching of African Literature and Artist and Audience: African Literature as a Shared Experience. He devoted several decades to research and publication on the oral traditions in West Africa, where he recorded epics narrated by griots, professional bards who maintain the cultural heritage of peoples in the Sahel region. He is also a prominent scholar on Aimé Césaire and has recently developed an online annotated bibliography of Césaire:  http://lesecritscesaire.libraries.psu.edu/. He served as head of the Department of French and Francophone Studies at the Pennsylvania State University from 2001 to 2008.

  • For additional information, please contact Laurie Taylor (laurien@ufl.edu).
  • All events in the Smathers Library, room 100.
  • All events are free and open to the public.
  • Sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere with support from the Rothman Endowment.
  • Co-Sponsored by the Creative Campus Program, Center for Latin American Studies, the Interdisciplinary Working Group on Caribbean Arts and Humanities, the Science Fiction Working Group, and Imagining Climate Change, the George A. Smathers Libraries, the Center for Gender, Sexualities, and Women’s Studies Research, the Department of English,  the Department of History, and the UF Informatics Institute.
  • Program Team Members: Leah Rosenberg, Randi Gill-Sadler, Prea Persaud; Chelsea Dinsmore, Tace Hedrick, Emily Hind, Maria Rogal,  Malini Johar Schueller, Maya Stanfield-Mazzi, Dhanashree Thorat, Laurie Taylor

Deadline for HASTAC 2017 extended: Now April 17

Call For Proposals

HASTAC 2017: The Possible Worlds of Digital Humanities, November 2-4, 2017

University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida

Submissions Deadline:   Monday April 17, 2017

DEADLINE EXTENSION! We recognize that this time of the year is busy with end-of-term projects and grading. We are responding to feedback about the CFP deadline, and to assist those who need a bit more time, we have extended the deadline to Monday, April 17th. This allows two more weekends to get proposals submitted.

In 2017, we invite you to join us at the University of Central Florida to explore “The Possible Worlds of Digital Humanities.” Orlando is known to tourists worldwide for theme parks that bring to life many imagined worlds and narratives, most of which reflect back to us dominant discourses and ideologies. Likewise, digital humanities struggles with building towards a future that is more inclusive and interdisciplinary. This year, we hope to address the unsolved hard problems and explore the new opportunities of the digital humanities. We particularly welcome submissions addressing themes such as:

  • challenges of monolingualism within the digital humanities
  • indigenous culture, decolonial and post-colonial theory and technology
  • technology and education–open learning, peer learning, and issues of access, equity for primary and/or higher education
  • communication of knowledge, publishing, and intellectual property
  • digital cultural heritage and hegemony
  • interdisciplinary goals and conversations in digital humanities
  • digital humanities and gender, race, and other identities
  • simulation, modeling, and visualization
  • games and gaming, including for learning
  • community development including the importance of art and culture districts
  • other unsolved hard problems in digital humanities

HASTAC 2017 will include plenary panels, workshops, roundtables, short “soapbox” talks, project demos, poster sessions, and a curated media arts show exhibition. At HASTAC, we invite you to think about the format of your session as well as the content.

We seek proposals for participant presentations in the following categories:

  • 5-8 minute “soapbox” talks
  • roundtables (be creative with your format — no reading papers!)
  • project demos
  • digital and/or print posters
  • maker sessions or workshops
  • Media arts (new media, games, and electronic literature)

For each submission, we will need the following information from you:

1) complete contact information including valid phone, email, and institutional affiliation, if any;

2) maximum 500-word abstract of the work you would like to present that must discuss its relationship to the conference themes;

3) any technical requirements or other support (including space requirements) that may be required for the presentation.  For exhibitions or other performances, please indicate any equipment that is absolutely required and that you cannot bring with you.  In the event that we cannot guarantee access to the equipment, we regret that we may not be able to accept your proposal.

Digital and/or Print Posters Wanted!

Print posters (4 x 3’) and electronic posters (to be projected) are solicited for emerging projects, ideas, and scholars. In presenting your research with a poster, you should aim to use the poster as a means for generating active discussion of your research. Limit the text to about one-fourth of the poster space, and use visuals (graphs, photographs, schematics, maps, etc.) to tell your story.  Use the regular submission form, but indicate that you are proposing a Poster by checking the appropriate box.

Maker Sessions & Workshops

We will provide some room and resources for individuals or groups to create informal maker spaces, where conference participants can share, exchange, and experiment with new online tools, personal fabrication technologies, open source electronics such as Arduino, and other creative and learning devices and gadgets. To propose a maker session or workshop, please use the standard submission form and indicate that yours is a maker session. Please also tell us how long the session requires!

Media Arts Show

The Media Arts Show invites creative works that engage with the show’s theme, “Soft(ware) Solutions / Hard Problems.” Works of new media, including games, electronic literature, and installations that meld physical and digital components, are welcome. Please provide a detailed description of the work, its purpose, and all technical and physical requirements for display.

All proposals will be peer-reviewed, but we regret that we cannot provide detailed reviewer feedback. We welcome applications from scholars at all stages of their careers from all disciplines and fields, from private sector companies and public sector organizations, from artists and public intellectuals, and from networks and individuals.

How to Submit

Presenters may be first author on only one submission; however, they can appear as secondary authors on other submissions.

Please select Submissions.

Webinar Series: Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age

carribean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event featuring innovative digital work in Dominica on January 18, 2017, at 11am (Miami Time).

Presenter: Dr. Schuyler Esprit, Dominica State College, Create Caribbean Inc.

Click here to participate in the online event: http://ufsmathers.adobeconnect.com/Caribbean

About the Presentation:

In the small island developing state of the Commonwealth of Dominica, the push towards Information and Communications Technology (ICT) development has risen rapidly on the national agenda. This is true for several sectors, including entrepreneurship and education. However, national efforts to understand the impact of expanding technologies, particularly through the use of digital humanities or humanities computing, has been much slower despite collective enthusiasm among library and museum experts, academics and other intellectuals workers about developing the technological scope and reach of their work. For the most part, efforts and resources to encourage ICT use have minimized these very knowledge and culture nerve centers that inform the content of entrepreneurship through technology. Create Caribbean Inc. is a research institute located in Dominica, designed on the principles and values of digital scholarship and practicing digital humanities methodologies, and is one of the first of its kind in the English-speaking Caribbean to formalize the confluence of archival studies, heritage preservation, academic research, higher education curriculum development and the wave of technological advancement. Founded in 2014, the Institute has entered into a partnership with the Dominica State College to institutionalize and create national conversation and impact on innovative knowledge acquisition and sharing amidst economic and geographic constraints that create large social gaps in access to libraries, research, cultural activities and technological experimentation. This presentation will explore the best practices of Create Caribbean Inc., the Research Institute at Dominica State College to consider its goals and objectives, growth process, challenges and plans for enhancement and expansion beyond Dominica and into the wider Caribbean. The presentation will outline the role of each of the institute’s core areas – heritage preservation, academic research, higher education curriculum development, college teaching and community outreach – through the lens of the digital humanities and its impact on the Caribbean space. I will also include a discussion of the benefits of adopting digital humanities vocabulary, theory and praxis within the region, adapting those elements to considerations of economic, social and political peculiarities of the Caribbean.

About the Speaker: Dr. Schuyler Esprit is a scholar of Caribbean literature and cultural studies, and postcolonial theory.  Dr. Esprit holds a PhD in English literature from University of Maryland – College Park. She is the Founding Director of Create Caribbean Inc. (http://createcaribbean.org/create/), Research Institute at Dominica State College. The Research Institute supports students and scholars to use digital technologies for research, teaching and learning in areas of Caribbean development, especially its culture, history and heritage. She currently works as Dean of Academic Affairs at Dominica State College. Dr. Esprit has also taught and held professional positions at a number of universities in the United States. She is now completing her book entitled West Indian Readers: A Social History and its digital companion, both of which are historical explorations of reading culture in the Caribbean. She has also written the introduction to the 2016 Papillote Press edition of The Orchid House, the 1953 novel by Dominican writer Phyllis Shand Allfrey.

About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:

The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, and the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Other upcoming webinars in the series include:

  • Feb. 28, 11am Miami time: Dr. Alex Gil on small axe: archipelagos
  • 11, 11am Miami time: Nathan Dize and Abby Broughton on Colony in Crisis
  • May 10, 11am Miami time, Dr. Sara Gonzalez on 3D printing services
  • Date pending for: Caribbean Memory

Recordings of all webinars will be available in dLOC soon after the webinar.

Please join us for next stage conversations from the webinars, to take place at ACURIL’s 2017 annual conference, focusing on Interdisciplinary Research in the Caribbean: http://acuril2017puertorico.com/

Twitter: @dlocaribbean