Tag Archives: research

Call for applications: “Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute,” a 2019-2020 NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Apply for the Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute 

Applications are due by February 1, 2019

Thanks to generous funding from the NEH, the Institute is pleased to be able to cover travel costs and offer a small stipend for participants. Participation includes 5 phases, with required attendance at the in-person session (May 20-24, 2019) and for virtual sessions (July-December 2019), along with creation of teaching materials (January-August 2020). Please see For Participants for more information on the Institute phases and funding.

Call for Applications

Call for Applications: “Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute,” a 2019-2020 NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Deadline: Applications are due Friday, February 1, 2019

Application Information: http://dloc.com/teach/apply

Partners in the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) are pleased to invite applications to an NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities entitled “Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute.” This Institute is designed for anyone who teaches or supports Caribbean Studies courses or sections dealing with Caribbean Studies in courses. This Institute is also aimed at people who are interested in learning ways to utilize digital collections and implement digital tools and methods into their teaching and collaborative practices. We seek participants who are looking to create new resources for teaching Caribbean Studies in multiple fields and varying types of institutions, as well as enhance the community of practice for engaging with DH. We welcome applications from professors, instructors, graduate students, and library faculty and staff.

Participants will gain DH teaching experience and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools (Scalar, TimelineJS, StoryMapJS, Mapping), processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty-six participants will acquire concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections. Through participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH, they will also learn to create Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies.

Program:

Comprised of introductory readings, a week-long in-person session (held May 20-24, 2019 at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida), and virtual sessions and online communication in the year following through August 2020, the Institute is structured to give participants the time and space to learn new approaches as well as integrate them into research and teaching. The overall goals of the Institute include gaining expertise in digital tools, with digital collections, and as part of a community of practice. Over the course of the program, participants will be supported in collaborating together and in developing teaching materials to be shared as Open Access.

See the Institute website for a more detailed schedule: http://dloc.com/teach/schedule

Institute Directors and Faculty:

Please see the Institute website for details on the directors and faculty: http://dloc.com/teach/faculty

Application Details:

The Institute will select 26 participants who regularly teach Caribbean Studies courses or sections dealing with Caribbean Studies in courses in related fields (e.g., history, literature, cultural studies, Black Studies, Global Studies). The classes can be at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and instructors, librarians, staff, and graduate students can apply. As we mentioned earlier, we are interested in recruiting participants who are looking to create new resources for teaching Caribbean Studies in multiple fields and varying types of institutions, as well as enhance the community of practice for engaging with DH.

Please see the Institute website for more details about stipends and conditions of award for participants: http://dloc.com/l/teach/forparticipants

Application to the Institute should include:

  • An up-to-date CV (short version, preferred).
  • A statement of interest (1-2 pages) that provides:
    • description of current teaching assignments and responsibilities
  • Optional:
    • description of a course, proposed course, or sample syllabus that engages with the Caribbean through the themes of migration, mobility, or sustainability.

Please send materials by February 1, 2019 to laurien@ufl.edu.

Applications will be reviewed by the selection committee (Taylor, Huet, Ortiz, Rosenberg, Asencio, and Felima).

The team will notify participants of acceptance by March 15, 2019.

The Institute’s priority will be to select a diverse mix of participants from institutions across the US, including specifically recruiting from Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, HBCUs, and HSIs given the rich collections, communities, and teaching connections related to Caribbean Studies. Priority also will be given to select participants from various humanities fields. Additionally, while Florida is the third most populous state, Caribbean Studies spans the whole of the US as a home to the diaspora. For those selected from Florida, priority will be given to those from institutions not represented on the project team.

More Information and Questions:

Please see the Institute website (http://dloc.com/l/teach/dhinstitute) for further details. Questions may be directed to laurien@ufl.edu

Final Acceptance

For final acceptance starting in March, participants will confirm:

  1. Attendance for the in-person Institute and virtual sessions
  2. That by June 2020 they will submit two DH assignments, developed by taking part in the Institute, for inclusion in dLOC’s Teaching Guides & Materials Collection for use by others. As with all materials in dLOC, participants retain all rights and may elect to share their materials via other repositories and websites.

Please contact the project director, Laurie Taylor, with any questions: laurien@ufl.edu

Logo of the NEH

 

 

 

 

 

This Institute has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this Institute, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

 

New Book Chapter is Out: Improving Graduate Students’ Research Skills

Hello everyone. I am pleased to announce that my book chapter “Improving Graduate Students’ Research Skills: The Graduate Student Research Series at the University of Florida.” is out in the book Transforming Libraries to Serve Graduate Students.

Interested in buying the book? You can find it here: https://www.alastore.ala.org/content/transforming-libraries-serve-graduate-students.

Thanks to the editors Crystal Renfro and Cheryl Stiles for their hard work.

Graduate Student Research Series – Fall 2018

Image of the poster for the Graduate STudent Research Series for Fall 2018

Fall 2018
Graduate Student Research Series

Could you use a little help with your research? With finding and synthesizing scholarly materials? With becoming an expert in your field? With editing and polishing your works as well as becoming a more effective academic writer?

UF Librarians Hélène Huet (European Studies), David Schwieder (Political Science), and Megan Daly (Classics, Philosophy, and Religion), and UF Professional Writing Professor Sean Trainor, will present a series of research-focused sessions to help graduate students with the following topics:

Wednesday October 3         Session 1: Finding Scholarly Materials for Your Research
Wednesday October 10       Session 2: Synthesizing Scholarly Materials and Becoming an Expert in Your Field
Wednesday October 17       Session 3: Becoming a Versatile, Effective Academic Writer
Wednesday October 24       Session 4: Editing and Polishing Abstracts, Papers, and Articles for Submission

All sessions are Period 4 10:40-11:30 a.m.
Room 212 Library West (Scott Nygren Studio)
No registration required
All UF Graduate and Professional Students Are Welcome

Session 1: Finding Scholarly Materials for Your Research

In this session, you will learn how to navigate the library’s website in order to find the books, articles, videos, and other materials needed for your research. You will also learn about various library and on-campus resources that will be of help during your academic career at the University of Florida

Session 2: Synthesizing Scholarly Materials and Becoming an Expert in Your Field

The heart of a graduate school education involves becoming an expert in your field. This session draws on cognitive and social psychology literatures to offer practical approaches designed to help you synthesize your voluminous graduate school reading load and effectively and efficiently develop subject field expertise.

Session 3: Becoming a Versatile, Effective Academic Writer

In this session, you will learn:

–           Four simple techniques you can adopt to enhance your academic writing, and;
–           Why writing like a journalist can make you a better scholarly writer.

Dr. Sean Trainor will lead the session. Dr. Trainor is a professor of professional writing at the University of Florida and a freelance writer.

Session 4: Editing and Polishing Abstracts, Papers, and Articles for Submission

How do you edit an abstract so it’s less than 300 words but still effectively communicates your ideas? How can you polish your conference paper so it reads well in front of a live audience? How can you perfect a draft of an article to make it clear, scholarly, and professional? This session offers tips on how to put the finishing touches on your work so you can put your best foot forward.

 

 

 

University of Florida Special Collections/Area Studies Travel Grants

The Special and Area Studies Collections at the University of Florida has issued its call for Travel to Collections grants.
Travel grants up to $2,500 are available to undertake research between August 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019 with any of UF’s Special and Area Studies Collections. Proposals are due Friday, June 1, 2018 with award notifications expected the week of July 1, 2018.
Judging criteria includes prioritization for interdisciplinary research and/or use of more than one collection, and proposals that support a feasible and tangible publication (e.g., an article, dissertation or book chapter). Awardees must travel 100 miles or farther to be eligible.

For application process and guidelines, please visit: http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/Travel2CollectionsCFP.pdf
For information on Special and Area Studies Collections, University of Florida: http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/
If you have questions about the suitability of your proposal, or need information on any aspect of the program, please contact Flo Turcotte by phone (352-273-2767) or email (turcotte@ufl.edu).

CFP: European Studies Research Forum American Library Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, June 21-26, 2018

CFP: European Studies Research Forum
American Library Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, June 21-26, 2018

The ACRL European Studies Section will host its annual European Studies Research Forum at the ALA annual conference in New Orleans on Sunday, June 24th, from 8:30 to 10:00 a.m.
The ESS Research and Planning Committee invites proposals for presentations on research, including digital projects, related to any part or language of Europe. Topics do not need to be library-related.
The committee will consider proposals on research in-progress or recently completed projects.
Proposals must include:

  • Name and brief bio of the presenter(s)
  • Tentative title and 200-word abstract

The committee will evaluate the proposals based on the clarity of the topic and quality of the abstract.
Presentations will be limited to 15 minutes each for 3 presentations, followed by time for questions. The forum will offer the presenters an opportunity to discuss their research in an informal setting.
Please submit your proposal via email to the chair of the ESS Research and Planning Committee, Ms. Téa Rokolj (trokolj@uottawa.ca). The deadline for proposal submissions is March 31st.
The proposals will be reviewed by the members of the committee who will choose 3 proposals for the forum.  All persons who submit a proposal will be contacted soon after the committee makes its decision by mid-April at the latest.

Graduate Student Research Series at UF Spring 2018

Could you use a little help with your research? With finding better scholarly sources and building scholarly knowledge? With preparing a research poster? With becoming a good academic writer?
UF Librarians Hélène Huet (European Studies), David Schwieder (Political Science), and Neelam Bharti (Chemistry), and UF Writing Instructor Sean Trainor, will present a series of research-focused sessions to help graduate students with the following topics:
Thursday February 8         Session 1: Finding Scholarly Sources
Thursday February 15       Session 2: Building Scholarly Knowledge
Thursday February 22       Session 3: Designing and Preparing a Research Poster
Thursday March 1             Session 4: Writing for All: How Thinking Like a Journalist Can Make You a Better Academic Writer
All sessions Period 4 10:40-11:30 a.m.
Room 212 Library West (Scott Nygren Studio)
No registration required
All UF Graduate and Professional Students Are Welcome
 
Grad-Student-Research-Series8x11

Humanities PhDs at Work: Career Paths in Librarianship. Video Online.

Back in September, my colleagues and I gave a talk at UF entitled: “Humanities PhDs at Work: Career Paths in Librarianship.” Our talk was filmed and the video is now available online.
As a reminder, here is the description of the talk:
Hélène Huet, Megan Daly, and Jessica Aberle are assistant librarians at the George A. Smathers Libraries. Though each presenter received a doctorate from their respective fields in the Humanities, Huet, Daly, and Aberle all chose to transition into the field of librarianship. If you are curious about the work that librarians undertake and whether a career in an academic library might be a good fit for you, this presentation will offer guidance. They will speak about their roles in the library and provide a brief overview of their work, followed with a discussion of their different career trajectories and the hurdles they encountered along the way. Then they will explain their decisions to pursue librarianship and why they love their work. Finally, they will provide resources and advice to those interested in libraries, archives, and information science.

Date Changes for Graduate Student Research Series [Note: No Class this Week]

Hello everyone,
As announced during the second GSRS session last week, due to the disruption caused by this Thursday’s controversial speaker we have decided to change the schedule for the final two GSRS sessions. Here is the new schedule:
Session 3: Building Scholarly Knowledge in Your Field                Thursday, October 26, 1:55-2:45 pm (Period 7)  Room 212 Library West
Session 4: Tips for Writing and Effective Scholarly Paper          Wednesday, November 1, 1:55-2:45 pm (Period 7)  Room 212 Library West
Please note the day change (from Thursday to Wednesday) for Session 4.
Hope to see you on the 26th.
 

12th Annual Symposium of Spanish and Portuguese Studies. January 27, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

12th Annual Symposium of Spanish and Portuguese Studies

January 27, 2018 at the University of Florida, Reitz Student Union

The Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies at the University of Florida cordially invites submissions for our 12th Annual Symposium of Spanish and Portuguese Studies.
We invite proposals for both individual presentations and panels (maximum of three presentations) from graduate students and faculty on topics related to Hispanic and Lusophone literature, linguistics, foreign language pedagogy, and other interdisciplinary studies, including Digital Humanities.
Please send a one-page abstract (approximately 250 words) to pfernand@ufl.edu
In the accompanying email, please provide the following information: your name, the presentation’s title, your position and institutional affiliation, and your preferred email address. Abstracts and presentations may be in Spanish, English, or Portuguese.
The submission deadline is November 1, 2017.
The keynote presentation for this year’s symposium is “The Digital Library of the Caribbean and Digital Humanities: Opportunities and Resources for Research, Teaching, and Collaboration” by:
Dr. Leah Rosenberg is an Associate Professor of English at the University of    Florida. She teaches Caribbean and Postcolonial studies, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary courses. A member of the advisory board of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com) since 2008, she has worked to build its dLOC’s holdings in Anglophone Caribbean literature and history as well as its pedagogical materials and ability to support collaborative teaching.
Dr. Hélène Huet is the European Studies Librarian at UF and oversees many international collections. As a digital humanist and the Vice-Chair of the Florida Digital Humanities Consortium (FLDH), a collective of institutions in Florida that seeks to promote an understanding of the humanities in light of digital technologies and research, she is particularly interested in studying how digital tools can help facilitate students and faculty’s research.
Dr. Laurie N. Taylor is a Digital Scholarship Librarian at UF, where her work focuses on socio-technical (people, policies, technologies, communities) needs for scholarly cyberinfrastructure. Her work activities are geared towards enabling a culture of radical collaboration that values and supports diversity and inclusivity, including as the Digital Scholarship Director for the Digital Library of the Caribbean                                         (dLOC) and is the Editor-in-Chief for the LibraryPress@UF.
Please direct questions to the Organizing Committee at pfernand@ufl.edu

PhotoKeynote

Poster of the Call for Papers


 

“Francophonie and Françafrique” a talk by Dr Thomas Hale

Wednesday, September 20, 2017
4pm, Pugh Hall 302
Francophonie and Françafrique
For this presentation, Dr. Thomas Hale will discuss the concepts of Francophonie and Françafrique. More particularly, he will show that while Francophonie and Françafrique have offered France different tools for influencing francophone countries in Africa, French support for the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie, an exemplar of soft power, is waning. The hard power of La Françafrique, France’s shadowy operations in francophone Africa, has attracted criticism by anti-colonial activists and the last three presidents of France.  The critics cite evidence for overlap of the two phenomena, and the emergence of a new form of French smart power in francophone Africa.
This talk is co-sponsored by The France Florida Research Institute with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States and the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.
This event is free and open to public
For more information please contact Hélène Huet (hhuet at ufl dot edu) or Alioune Sow (sow at ufl dot edu)