education

Webinar announcement: “Beyond Trinkets: The Value of 3D in the Library,” May 10, 2017, at 9:30am (Miami Time)

carribean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event, “Beyond Trinkets: The Value of 3D in the Library,” May 10, 2017, at 9:30am (Miami Time).

Presenter: Dr. Sara Gonzalez, Marston Science Library, University of Florida

Click here to participate in the online event: http://ufsmathers.adobeconnect.com/Caribbean

About the Presentation:

“Beyond Trinkets: The Value of 3D in the Library”

In spring 2014, the UF Libraries opened its 3D services to the university and public.  This service, funded by student technology fees, expanded from 2 small 3D printers in the science library to now include 4 branch libraries with 10 3D printers, and circulates multiple portable 3D printers and scanners.  The library accepted over 1000 3D orders last year and librarians regularly teach workshops to the campus community and public, along with offering specialized consultations regarding 3D scanning and printing.

This presentation will provide an introduction to 3D printing and scanning technology, describe the opportunities and challenges of offering 3D technology in a library, and provide case studies that illustrate the potential of 3D across disciplines.

About the Speaker:

Sara Gonzalez is a science librarian at the University of Florida where she is the physical sciences and mathematics liaison and coordinates UF Libraries’ 3D Service and the MADE@UF software and virtual reality development lab.  She holds a Ph.D. in Geophysics from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an M.L.I.S. from Florida State University.  Her current research interests include emerging technologies in libraries, modeling and visualization of data, and scientific literacy instruction. Dr. Gonzalez recently co-authored 3D Printing: A Practical Guide for Librarians (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016).

About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:

The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Other upcoming webinars in the series include:

  • Date pending for: Caribbean Memory

Recordings of all webinars will be available in dLOC soon after the webinar.

Please join us for next stage conversations from the webinars, to take place at ACURIL’s 2017 annual conference, focusing on Interdisciplinary Research in the Caribbean: http://acuril2017puertorico.com/

Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship

Twitter: @dlocaribbean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, Webinar 3, Colony in Crisis

carribean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event featuring innovative digital work with Colony in Crisis, April 11, 2017, at 11am (Miami Time).

Presenter: Nathan Dize and Abby Broughton (Vanderbilt University)

Click here to participate in the online event: http://ufsmathers.adobeconnect.com/Caribbean

About the Presentation:

A digital project created in 2014 through the collaboration of two graduate students and a librarian, A Colony in Crisis (CiC, https://colonyincrisis.lib.umd.edu/) exemplifies interdisciplinary and interdepartmental research in the contemporary, media-enhanced age of humanities scholarship. Working through the framework of the grain crisis of 1789 in colonial Saint-Domingue, CiC provides English translations and introductions of original French pamphlets in hopes of promoting a glimpse into one of the many alternative histories of the Atlantic World in the years preceding the Haitian Revolution. With the goal of curating archival documents in order to offer students and scholars alike the possibility of working with archival texts across language barriers, the team partners with instructors to implement the project in the undergraduate classroom. Fall 2015 saw the implementation of CiC in an upper-level French literature course. One year later, the team reflects on their first foray into the classroom and where to steer the project over the years to come.

About the Speakers:

Abby R. Broughton is a PhD student in the Department of French and Italian at Vanderbilt University, where she specializes in 20th century queer literature, body and identity politics, and the intersection of illustration and text. Abby is a co-author, translator, and editor of A Colony in Crisis: The Saint-Domingue Grain Shortage of 1789.

Nathan H. Dize is a PhD student in the Department of French and Italian at Vanderbilt University where he specializes in Haitian theater, poetry, and revolutionary poetics during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Nathan is the content curator, translator, and editor of A Colony in Crisis: The Saint-Domingue Grain Shortage of 1789.

About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:

The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Other upcoming webinars in the series include:

  • May 10, 11am Miami time, Dr. Sara Gonzalez on 3D printing services

Recordings of all webinars will be available in dLOC soon after the webinar.

Please join us for next stage conversations from the webinars, to take place at ACURIL’s 2017 annual conference, focusing on Interdisciplinary Research in the Caribbean: http://acuril2017puertorico.com/

 

Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship

Twitter: @dlocaribbean

Position Vacancy Announcement: Instruction and Outreach Librarian at the University of Florida

DEADLINE DATE: May 1, 2017applications will be reviewed beginning April 5, 2017
Please note that this posting has specific instructions for the submission of application materials – see our website at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/pers/careers.htm
JOB SUMMARY
The Instruction and Outreach Librarian at the George A. Smathers Libraries is a 12 month, tenure track faculty position, which serves as the instruction, outreach, and student engagement librarian with additional responsibilities supporting Library West’s Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS) reference and collection services. Develops and leads library programs related to student engagement and information literacy instruction. Connects the Libraries with campus-wide initiatives focused on student engagement, success, and academic wellbeing. As the liaison to the University Writing Program, Innovation Academy, the Honors Program, and the Dean of Students Office, develops customized information literacy programming and works with the Assessment Librarian to assess services to undergraduate students. Works closely with and provides training and support for all Library West faculty and staff members who teach. Coordinates all major H&SS instruction initiatives in collaboration with other branch libraries.

The Libraries encourages staff participation in reaching management decisions and consequently the Instruction and Outreach Librarian will serve on various committees and teams. To support all students and faculty, and foster excellence in a diverse and global society, the Instruction and Outreach Librarian will be expected to include individuals of diverse backgrounds, experiences, races, ethnicities, gender identities, sexual orientation, and perspectives in work activities. The Instruction and Outreach Librarian will pursue professional development opportunities, including research, publication, and professional service activities in order to meet library-wide criteria for tenure and promotion.

RESPONSIBILITIES:
1. Coordinates the Library West undergraduate instruction and information literacy program, including creating and updating instructional materials, videos, course guides, and tutorials using a variety of formats including print, digital, and web-based technologies such as LibGuides and social media.
2. Liaises with the University Writing Program (UWP), Innovation Academy (IA), the Honors Program, and the Dean of Students Office (DSO). Regularly communicates and meets with the departments’ staff and faculty; provides specialized assistance to faculty and students. Builds and strengthens established relationships with groups on campus.
3. Actively pursues new humanities and social sciences outreach opportunities on campus; cultivates new constituencies and identifies new services.
4. Co-chairs the Smathers Libraries Instruction Committee and leads instruction and outreach strategies to promote and support library programs, services, and collections. Coordinates H&SS instruction programs with other libraries on campus.
5. Teaches sections of Introduction to Library and Internet Research (LIS2001). Leads the Libraries Instruction Committee in development of new content for LIS2001, supports other LIS instructors, and helps promote and market the course.
6. Provides reference services at the Research Assistance Desk, online via chat and email, and by appointment.
7. Defines goals, establishes objectives, plans and manages budgets, and coordinates collection development activities with other subject specialists and librarians.
8. Participates in appropriate professional development and continuing education endeavors and engages in scholarly research resulting in publication, including digital humanities projects.
9. Participates in planning, policy formation, and department decision-making relating to Library West services, collections, and new technologies.
10. Represents the Libraries in appropriate university, local, state, regional, and national bodies.
11. Participates in Library fundraising efforts.

QUALIFICATIONS
Required:
– Master’s degree in Library and/or Information Science from an ALA-accredited program, or equivalent professional experience, plus advanced degree in subject specialty.
– Eight years of relevant, post graduate degree experience for appointment at the Associate University Librarian rank.
– Experience with in person and online instruction.
– Competence with information technologies and demonstrated effectiveness in integrating technology with traditional services and resources, particularly instruction.
– Excellent verbal and written communication skills, as well as strong presentation skills.
– Excellent analytical and organizational skills.
– Ability to work both independently and collaboratively as part of a team within a culturally diverse user community of faculty, students, staff, administrators, and the general public.
– Capacity to thrive in a dynamic environment, respond effectively to shifting needs and priorities of library constituents, and afford a willingness to be flexible with liaison and selector assignments as appointed.
– Flexible and forward-thinking approach to challenges and opportunities.
– Strong potential for meeting the requirements of tenure and promotion outlined at http://library.ufl.edu/cdh.

Preferred:
– Advanced degree in a related field in the humanities and/or social sciences, or in curricular design.
– Experience providing instructional services and outreach in an academic or research library environment.
– Experience in provision of online and in person reference assistance to users or experience with public service.
– Experience in the digital humanities.
– Experience managing collections in an academic or research library.
– Record of including individuals of diverse backgrounds, experiences, races, ethnicities, gender identities, sexual orientations, and perspectives in research, teaching, service and other work.

APPLICATION PROCESS
To apply, submit 1) a cover letter detailing your interest in and qualifications for this position; 2) a written statement regarding instructional needs in academic libraries (250 words); 3) your current resume or CV; and 4) a list of three references including their contact information (address, telephone number, and email). Apply by May 1, 2017 (applications will be reviewed beginning April 5, 2017). Submit all application materials through the Jobs at UF online application system at http://explore.jobs.ufl.edu/cw/en-us/job/501741/instruction-outreach-librarian Failure to submit the required documents may result in the application not being considered. If you have any questions or concerns about this process please contact Bonnie Smith, George A. Smathers Libraries Human Resources Office, at bonniesmith@ufl.edu.

Graduate Student Research Series Spring 17

And we are back for another semester of workshops dedicated to helping graduate students with their research. Two colleagues and I will be offering 4 workshops on the following topics: Finding scholarly sources, Reading scholarly sources effectively, Building scholarly knowledge in your field, and Tips for writing an effective scholarly paper.

The sessions are open to all graduate and professional students at UF and will be held in room 212 Library West (aka Scott Nygren Studio) from 1.55-2.45pm.

See you there.workshops

Issues in Humanities Data Sharing

I would like to share with you the gist of the presentation I gave to the National Federation of Advanced Information Services 2016 Humanities Roundtable in Atlanta in September 2016.

For this talk, I focused on one of the biggest barriers to humanities data sharing: fear. Fear can take many forms, but the one I wanted to discuss was the fear of not getting credit.

This fear of not getting credit is what framed my talk. First, I explained how this fear has impacted, and in some cases inhibited, my work as a digital humanist. Second, I discussed how I have tried to overcome this fear. Third and finally, I discussed how, as a liaison librarian, I am trying to help faculty and graduate students overcome their own fears of not getting credit for their work.

Fear as a Digital Humanist

First, it is important for me to point out that the fear of not getting credit has prevented me from sharing more information as part of my digital humanities project, Mapping Decadence. Where did this fear originate and why did I become afraid of putting too much information on my website?

The fear was instilled in me at the very beginning of graduate school, years before I started developing my project. Some faculty members made it clear that publishing articles was the most important thing I could do to advance my career. While my digital project was interesting and “trendy”—and thus an asset on the job market—what mattered more were the articles I could base on this project. As such, when I started working on my DH mapping project, I was advised not to put too much information online. Doing so, I was warned, might enable other scholars to steal my work (and thus prevent me from getting my articles in print).

Retrospectively, I should have realized that making my research available online would only enhance my profile and help me on the job market. And so it did.

Just as importantly, sharing my research allows me to fulfill my original goal for Mapping Decadence. The reason I wanted to create a DH project in the first place was to be able to share my work/data with everyone who has internet access. I don’t believe our research should only be only accessible to a happy few.

What are the steps I have taken to try to overcome my fear of not getting credit? (spoiler alert: I still worry about not getting credit)

  • I listened to colleagues and collaborators who told me that my project would be greatly enhanced by sharing more information. These individuals include:
    • Kathy Weimer (Head of Kelley Center for Government Information, Data, and Geospatial Services at Rice University) during a GIS workshop for the international DH conference in Sydney, Australia;
    • Miriam Posner (DH program coordinator at UCLA)’s students who reviewed my project for a class (I found these reviews by chance when googling my website);
    • Paige Morgan, DH librarian at the University of Miami.
  • In each case, my reviewers consistently informed me that I needed to share more data.
    • Some of the information that I was encouraged to share has or will be easy to add to the project. These modifications include noting the sources of my data and adding legends to my maps.
    • Nevertheless, there are others kinds of information my reviewers asked me to share that will pose greater challenges – not least because of my deeply-instilled fears. These include sharing my analyses/results. This kind of modification to the project remains a roadblock, as I am on the TT and I need to publish an analysis of my data in article form for tenure.

Dealing with others’ fears as a liaison librarian

Finally, as a liaison librarian, I have tried to help faculty and graduate students overcome their fear of not getting credit. Let me start by sharing a little anecdote: I met a professor once who explained that s/he only presents papers that have already been accepted for publications because s/he does not want their research stolen. I am sure we all know someone who does this kind of thing. But I have to say, this is so far from the way I see and do things that, as a liaison librarian and a scholar, I have been actively working to help others deal with their fears.

This is why I believe that “education” is the keyword here. The first step I take is talking about the advantages of putting one’s work online (enhancing one’s scholarly profile, earning colleagues’ goodwill, etc.). The second step I take is reminding scholars that there are large and important aspects of their work that they can share without revealing their conclusions or endangering their publications.

What are my strategies to provide education that would help scholars overcome their fears?

  • Educate colleagues about the Institutional Repository (IR@UF where I work for instance). Many people believe that, simply because they’ve published an article on a topic, it is now widely available to others. Introducing colleagues to the IR thus helps acquaint them with larger research accessibility issues while directing them to institutional resources that will help put their work before a wider audience.
  • Provide education through Digital Humanities working groups: help organize talks and invite speakers who have experience in the digital world, promote the events to my patrons and incite them to attend the talks/workshops, etc.
  • Use examples that show colleagues how sharing data can result in positive career outcomes. Rather than seeing data sharing as an invitation to data theft, I want scholars to view data sharing as a way to boost one’s profile, attach one’s name to a project, and advance other scholars’ work in the process. The benefits of sharing thus far outweigh possible risks.

This is not to say these strategies always work. It can be hard to get meetings with faculty to discuss IR/DH/data and it is much easier when this is done on a 1-on-1 basis. But little by little, my hope is that humanities scholars will overcome their fear and see the benefits of data sharing.