Caribbean

Symposium, Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean, Sept. 21-22, 2017 University of Florida

Please save the date for the upcoming symposium:

Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean

Date: September 21 and 22

Locations: Smathers Library, room 100

The full event information is online (http://digitalhumanities.group.ufl.edu/event/collaborating-across-the-divide-digital-humanities-and-globalization-sept-21-23-2017/).

We hope that you can join for the symposium, and we look forward to the event as a place for conversation on next steps in regional collaboration!   Please share on any questions, and please share this with others!

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About the Symposium:

Digital technology has made the early twenty-first century a critical moment of opportunity by providing access to a wide range of library and archival materials and by offering new means of teaching, analyzing content, and presenting literary scholarship. While digital technologies have the promise of bridging institutional and geographic barriers, they have also continued to reproduce colonial hierarchies and marginalize content from the Caribbean and the Global South. This symposium, “Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean,” brings together scholars and artists from the Caribbean and the United States to discuss how to collaborate through digital humanities in ways that decolonize knowledge and empower Caribbean subjects, rather than reaffirm colonial histories of archiving and education.  The project will center on the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com), an international partnership whose technological and DH hub is the University of Florida. The objective of the symposium is to produce an action plan for making dLOC a hub for pedagogical, scholarly, and artistic collaboration.

Schedule:

Thursday, 21 Sept., 5-6:45pm:

  • Introduction and Presentation: Oonya Kempadoo

Friday, 22 Sept.:

  • 9-10:45am: Panel: “DH and Non-DH Collaboration within the Academy,” Rosamond King and Matthew Smith
  • 10:45-11am: Break
  • 11am-12:45pm: Panel: “Public Humanities and DH Collaboration: Pedagogy beyond Academia,” Gabriele Hosein and Schuyler Esprit
  • 12:45-2:15pm: Lunch Break
  • 2:15-3:15pm: Platforms for Caribbean DH: Thomas Hale and others
  • 3:15-3:30pm: Break
  • 3:30-5pm, Roundtable:
  • 5-5:15pm: Closing remarks

Speakers:

OONYA KEMPADOO is author of Buxton Spice (1997), winner of the Tide Running (2001), and All Decent Animals (2013); winner of the Casa de Las Americas Prize (2002), and consultant in the arts and social development, including work with UNICEF, UNAID. She was Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence and Creative Writing Instructor (2013-2014) at two colleges in Connecticut; and serves advisor to Caribbean literacy non-profit “Hands Across the Sea” and co-founder of the Grenada Community Library & Resource Center in St George’s Grenada. An internationally acclaimed novelist, she is a leader in digital arts and educational collaboration in the Caribbean. Kempadoo has initiated two digital projects to support environmental sustainability in the Caribbean. The first, Naniki, is a speculative fiction, multi-media, eco-social project designed to engage students in the Caribbean and other countries in using digital technology and supporting environmental sustainability. The second, Carisealand, is a digital platform for scholars, artists, and the public for sharing projects on sustainability, designed and built by Create Caribbean Research Institute and it’s students (Dominica State College).

SCHUYLER ESPRIT is a scholar of Caribbean literature and cultural studies. Dr. Esprit holds a PhD in English literature from University of Maryland – College Park. She currently serves as dean of Academic Affairs at Dominica State College as well as director of the Create Caribbean Research Institute. She has pioneered Digital Humanities projects and digital technology training at the K-12 and College level in Dominica as well as collaboratively, linking classes at the Dominica State College and classes at colleges in the United States. She is now completing her book manuscript and its digital companion, both entitled Occasions for Caribbean Reading, a historical exploration of reading culture in the Caribbean.

GABRIELLE HOSEIN, Director of the Institute for Gender & Development Studies, at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad), which is home to several significant digital and public humanities projects, including Caribbean Review of Gender Studies, an open access peer-reviewed journal, of which Hosein is associate editor. Hosein is Principle Investigator for Politics, Power and Gender Justice in the Anglophone Caribbean, 2011-2014, member of the research team for the project Building Responsive Policy: Gender, Sexual Cultures and HIV & AIDS in the Caribbean, 2008-2011, and co-editor of Indo-Caribbean Feminist Thought Genealogies, Theories, Enactments (Palgrave 2016).

MATTHEW J. SMITH is Professor in History and Head, Department of History and Archaeology, The UWI, Mona. His areas of research include Haitian politics, society, and migration. He is the author of the books Liberty, Fraternity, Exile: Haiti and Jamaica After Emancipation (University of North Carolina Press, 2014), winner of the Haiti Illumination Project Book Prize from the Haitian Studies Association and Red and Black in Haiti: Radicalism, Conflict, and Political Change, 1934-1957 (University of North Carolina Press, 2009) which was a winner of the Gordon K and Sybil Lewis prize for best book in Caribbean History from the Caribbean Studies Association. He had contributed significantly to dLOC’s teacher training program and to its edited collection Haiti: An Island Luminous; his service work utilizes the digital for critical needs, including as Director of UWI-Mona’s Haiti Initiative following the 2010 earthquake providing assistance to Haitian university students and the Haitian national library, his work serving as Director of the UWI’s Social History Project, and as member of the Board of Museums and Archives of the Institute of Jamaica.

ROSAMOND KING (Associate Professor of English, Brooklyn College, CUNY) is a critical and creative writer and artist, whose work focuses on the Caribbean and sexuality. Her book Island Bodies: Transgressive Sexualities in the Caribbean Imagination won the 2015 Caribbean Studies Association Gordon K. and Sybil Lewis Prize for the best Caribbean Studies Book. She is also a poet, artist, and performer with an extensive record of publications and performances. She is also a leader in digitizing LBGTQ archival materials from the Caribbean for dLOC and has collaboratively developed and taught with Dr. Angelique Nixon, a distributed online collaborative course (DOCC) in the US and Caribbean on sexualities.

THOMAS HALE was one of the founders of the African Literature Association, a field of study that developed in the early 1970s. Two of his early books reflect this initiative: The Teaching of African Literature and Artist and Audience: African Literature as a Shared Experience. He devoted several decades to research and publication on the oral traditions in West Africa, where he recorded epics narrated by griots, professional bards who maintain the cultural heritage of peoples in the Sahel region. He is also a prominent scholar on Aimé Césaire and has recently developed an online annotated bibliography of Césaire:  http://lesecritscesaire.libraries.psu.edu/. He served as head of the Department of French and Francophone Studies at the Pennsylvania State University from 2001 to 2008.

  • For additional information, please contact Laurie Taylor (laurien@ufl.edu).
  • All events in the Smathers Library, room 100.
  • All events are free and open to the public.
  • Sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere with support from the Rothman Endowment.
  • Co-Sponsored by the Creative Campus Program, Center for Latin American Studies, the Interdisciplinary Working Group on Caribbean Arts and Humanities, the Science Fiction Working Group, and Imagining Climate Change, the George A. Smathers Libraries, the Center for Gender, Sexualities, and Women’s Studies Research, the Department of English,  the Department of History, and the UF Informatics Institute.
  • Program Team Members: Leah Rosenberg, Randi Gill-Sadler, Prea Persaud; Chelsea Dinsmore, Tace Hedrick, Emily Hind, Maria Rogal,  Malini Johar Schueller, Maya Stanfield-Mazzi, Dhanashree Thorat, Laurie Taylor

New dLOC Video Tutorials in Spanish

Hello everyone,

A few weeks ago I was awarded a Smathers graduate student internship, which enabled me to hire a graduate student to support dLOC‘s ongoing efforts to enhance its website’s accessibility and ease of navigation for Spanish users.

Today we release the first task the intern had to do: create video tutorials in Spanish with captions on the following topics: What is dLOC? How does one do a simple search? How does one do a text search? How does one do an advanced search? How does one do a map search? And last but not least, How does one read an item and its metadata?

Thank you so much to my intern, Francesc Morales for his hard work on these.

PS: If for some reason you want to read my proposal for the internship, then please go ahead and have fun.

 

POSITION VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT: Head Curator , Latin American and Caribbean Collection (LACC)

POSITION VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT POSITION: Head Curator, Latin American and Caribbean Collection (LACC)

RANK: Associate University Librarian or University Librarian

REPORTS TO: Chair, Special and Area Studies Collections

SALARY: $ 63,415 minimum salary at the Associate University Librarian rank
$ 69,254 minimum salary at the University Librarian rank
Actual salary will reflect selected professional’s experience and credentials

REQUISITION #: 502196

DEADLINE: June 15, 2017 (applications will be reviewed beginning May 24, 2017) Please note the specific instructions to submit application materials on our website at http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/pers/careers.htm and in the APPLICATION PROCESS section below. Failure to include all required documents may result in your application being disqualified.

SETTING

Gainesville is a welcoming city offering unique outdoor activities, excellent museums, historical sites, a strong music scene, quality breweries, eclectic dining and local food choices, and a great variety of sporting events. One and half hours to either coast, four hours to Atlanta, and six hours to Miami, Gainesville is well situated for exploring the North Central Florida region and beyond. The George A. Smathers Libraries encourage participation in decision making and innovative projects, offering a unique grants management program and a strong learning environment. The Special and Area Studies Collections Department faculty and staff offer a collegial, supportive, and active tenure home, together promoting, curating, and providing public access to a broad array of distinctive special and circulating collections.

JOB SUMMARY

The Special and Area Studies Collections Department seeks an experienced leader to provide strategic vision and overall management of a preeminent collection in a dynamic, engaging environment at the University of Florida. The Head Curator of the LACC will contribute to scholarship at the Smathers Libraries in this full-time, tenure-track faculty position. A successful candidate will serve as the key liaison for the Libraries’ partnerships related to the Biblioteca Nacional de Cuba José Martí digitization project and other initiatives. The Head Curator will collaborate closely within the Libraries, with faculty and students at the Center for Latin American Studies, and with campus departments to promote distinctive collections and to support emerging research and teaching needs at the University of Florida.

The Head Curator will coordinate a collaborative team of experienced library faculty and staff in establishing LACC priorities, goals, and procedures for public services, technical services, and for the management of Latin American and Caribbean circulating and special collections, overseeing these materials budgets. The Head Curator will also participate in instructional, community, and fundraising outreach, bibliographical control, digitization projects, exhibits, and in consultation with the Chair, will liaise between the LACC unit and the Libraries’ administration. The Smathers Libraries encourage staff participation in reaching management decisions and consequently, the Head Curator of LACC will serve on department and library-wide committees and teams. The incumbent will pursue research, publication, and professional service activities to meet library-wide criteria for tenure and promotion.

RESPONSIBILITIES

The Head Curator of the LACC is a faculty position with administrative responsibilities who will provide strategic leadership for the physical and digital holdings, personnel, and resources related to Latin American and Caribbean Studies in the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. Responsibilities include overall management and development of the LACC holdings, programs, evolving and changing priority initiatives, and creating a strong team based unit through personnel management skills. This position initiates and manages strategic initiatives, programs, outreach activities, grants, and special projects, including a current initiative to digitize Cuba materials in partnership with leading North American repositories.

The following faculty responsibilities are integrated into the position of Head Curator of LACC:

  • Advances the preeminence of UF through leadership in fields related to Latin American and Caribbean librarianship, with attention to the historically significant relationship of UF to Caribbean and Latin American studies and commitment to mutually-beneficial partnerships.
  • Establishes and manages strategic projects that promote the national and international profile of LACC, its mission, and its holdings, in collaboration with and as requested by the Chair and other administrators. Serves as the key liaison with institutional partners, communicating effectively in English and Spanish.
  • Maintains oversight for LACC collections, budgets, approval plans, and documentation, with supervision and evaluation of LACC faculty directly managing circulating and special collections. Establishes overall priorities for cataloging, selection, storage, transfer, and preservation, in consultation with circulating and special collections specialists.
  • Provides consultative services and instructional outreach to faculty and advanced graduate students in Latin American and Caribbean studies, engaging with faculty and students to ensure Library support of university needs and awareness of relevant library resources and information; maintains currency with relevant emerging scholarship and resources at UF and in the field.
  • Collaborates with Chair regarding support services and may directly supervise public services staff.
  • Proactively advances access to LACC materials through UF digitization, creation and enhancement of metadata, and exhibition or other dissemination programs; as well as to related collections through partnerships such as Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and the Cuban digitization project.
  • Oversees the positioning of LACC within the Special and Area Studies Collections Department through collaborative services and alignment with departmental, Libraries, and UF goals; bringing the Libraries into close alignment with the Center for Latin American Studies faculty and programs.
  • Works closely with the Libraries’ Development Office (Development Officers and Public Information Officer) to organize fundraising and donor relations activities.
  • Pursues professional development opportunities, including research, publication, and professional association activities, to meet library-wide criteria for tenure and promotion.
  • Serves on Library and departmental consultative bodies as appropriate.

QUALIFICATIONS

Required:

  • Professional level knowledge of Spanish and English.
  • MLIS degree or equivalent experience.
  • Eight years of relevant experience with subject and cultural expertise in Latin American and Caribbean studies.
  • Record of progressive accomplishment as a scholar-librarian.
  • Excellent oral, written, interpersonal, and international communication skills to successfully and proactively interact with colleagues in the Libraries, the scholarly community, and institutional partners including those abroad.
  • Evidence of leadership and/or collaboration in one or more major projects related to creating, disseminating or maintaining scholarly or cultural resources, such as a library collection.
  • Successful human resource management experience including supervising, managing and motivating team members.
  • Ability to work effectively as part of a team within a diverse client community of faculty, students, community members, administrators, staff, and library patrons.
  • Strong potential to meet requirements for tenure and promotion (outlined at http://cms.uflib.ufl.edu/cdh/Index.aspx).

Preferred:

  • Advanced degree in a field relevant to position, with PhD or equivalent preferred.
  • Strong knowledge of existing and emerging trends in scholarship related to Cuba or the Spanish Caribbean.
  • Excellence in bibliographical research, heritage preservation, or area related to librarianship.
  • Experience in grant writing, budget management, and/or development.
  • Record of including individuals of diverse backgrounds, experiences, races, ethnicities, genders, and perspectives in research, teaching, service and other work.

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

The University of Florida (UF) is a major, public, comprehensive, land-grant, research university. The state’s oldest and most comprehensive university, UF is among the nation’s most academically diverse public universities. UF was ranked 9th among public universities in Forbes’ “America’s Best Employers 2015.” UF has a long history of established programs in international education, research and service. In 2013 the Florida Legislature designated UF as the state’s preeminent institution which grew into an opportunity to achieve national and international recognition for the University’s work in serving students and the world. It is one of only 17 public, land-grant universities that belong to the Association of American Universities. UF traces its beginnings to a small seminary in 1853 and is now one of the largest universities in the nation, with more than 50,000 students. For more information, please consult the UF homepage at http://www.ufl.edu.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES

The libraries of the University of Florida form the largest information resource system in the state of Florida. The UF Libraries consist of seven libraries on the Gainesville campus and three off-campus facilities; six of the campus libraries, and all of the off-site facilities, are in the system known as the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. The remaining library is the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center. Collectively, the UF Libraries (the Smathers Libraries and the Legal Information Center) hold or provide access to over 5.45 million print volumes, 8,100,000 microfilms, 1.25 million e-books, over 152,000 full-text electronic journals, over 1100 electronic databases, 1.26 million documents and 1.35 million maps and images. The UF Libraries have built several nationally significant research collections, including the Latin American and Caribbean, Judaica, Florida History, Children’s Literature, and Map and Imagery collections. The UF Libraries are a member of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the Center for Research Libraries (CRL), and the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL). The library staff consists of more than 300 FTE librarians, technical/clerical staff and student assistants. The organizational chart is available at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/orgchart.pdf.

SPECIAL AND AREA STUDIES COLLECTIONS

Special and Area Studies Collections encompasses Area Studies Collections, the Map & Imagery Library, and the Special Collections of the University of Florida. The Area Studies Collections are the Latin American and Caribbean Collection; the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica; and the African Studies and Asian Studies collections. Special Collections include the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature, the Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts, the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, the General Manuscript Collection, the Rare Book Collection, and the University Archives.

LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN COLLECTION

The LACC is one of the finest collections for the study of Latin American and Caribbean studies in the world. It contains approximately 500,000 volumes, 1,100 current / active serial titles, some 50,000 microforms, and a growing body of computer-based information and digital material. The LACC is a major contributor to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), supports the study of Latin American and the Caribbean studies at the University of Florida and internationally, and is closely associated with the UF Center for Latin American Studies. The LACC is one of the few such collections in the United States that maintains its own reading room and specialized reference staff. It is now open in newly renovated quarters on the 3rd floor of Smathers Library. COMMUNITY Gainesville, Florida and the surrounding community are home to approximately 257,000 people and both the University of Florida and Santa Fe College. Situated just over an hour from the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean, the city is surrounded by over 40 nature parks, including many spring-fed lakes and rivers. In 2015, Gainesville was named the “Best Midsize College City in America” by WalletHub and ranked no. 7 on Livability.com “Top 10 College Towns”. Gainesville is known as an innovative municipal government and an innovative city. Gainesville continues to receive national recognition as a top-rated city. Some of Gainesville’s accolades are listed at the Gainesville Awards and Recognition link. The Guide to Greater Gainesville combines award winning photography and compelling articles that capture all the reasons for calling Greater Gainesville your next home. The area has numerous cultural institutions and is a haven for sports fans. Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, Tallahassee, and St. Augustine are all within a two-hour drive. Gainesville is an affordable city and area to live in – using a cost of living calculator you can compare cities across the United States. See how affordable Gainesville really is!

BENEFITS

Vacation days, paid holidays, and sick leave days; retirement plan options; insurance benefits; tuition fee waiver program; no state or local income tax. Prospective employees should review the information about employment and benefits at UF available at http://hr.ufl.edu/benefits/.

APPLICATION PROCESS

To apply, submit 1) a cover letter detailing your interest in and qualifications for this position; 2) a written statement regarding creating and supporting a preeminent Latin American and Caribbean collection (250 words); 3) your current resume or CV; and 4) a list of three references including their contact information (address, telephone number, and email). Apply by June 15, 2017 (applications will be reviewed beginning May 24, 2017). Submit all application materials through the Jobs at UF online application system at http://explore.jobs.ufl.edu/cw/en-us/job/502196/head-curator-latin-american-and-caribbean-collectionlacc Failure to include all required documents may result in your application being disqualified. If you have questions or concerns about the process please contact Bonnie Smith, George A. Smathers Libraries Human Resources Office, at bonniesmith@ufl.edu.

The University of Florida is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages applications from women and minority group members. We are dedicated to the goal of building a culturally diverse and pluralistic environment; we strongly encourage applications from women, members of underrepresented groups, individuals with disabilities, and veterans. As part of the application process, applicants are invited to complete an on-line confidential and voluntary demographic self-disclosure form which can be found at: http://www.hr.ufl.edu/job/datacard.htm. This information is collected by the University of Florida’s Office of Human Resources to track applicant trends and is in no way considered by the Smathers Libraries in the selection process.

Final candidate will be required to provide official transcript to the hiring department upon hire. A transcript will not be considered “official” if a designation of “Issued to Student” is visible. Degrees earned from an education institution outside of the United States are required to be evaluated by a professional credentialing service provider approved by National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES), which can be found at http://www.naces.org/.

Webinar announcement: “Beyond Trinkets: The Value of 3D in the Library,” May 10, 2017, at 9:30am (Miami Time)

carribean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event, “Beyond Trinkets: The Value of 3D in the Library,” May 10, 2017, at 9:30am (Miami Time).

Presenter: Dr. Sara Gonzalez, Marston Science Library, University of Florida

Click here to participate in the online event: http://ufsmathers.adobeconnect.com/Caribbean

About the Presentation:

“Beyond Trinkets: The Value of 3D in the Library”

In spring 2014, the UF Libraries opened its 3D services to the university and public.  This service, funded by student technology fees, expanded from 2 small 3D printers in the science library to now include 4 branch libraries with 10 3D printers, and circulates multiple portable 3D printers and scanners.  The library accepted over 1000 3D orders last year and librarians regularly teach workshops to the campus community and public, along with offering specialized consultations regarding 3D scanning and printing.

This presentation will provide an introduction to 3D printing and scanning technology, describe the opportunities and challenges of offering 3D technology in a library, and provide case studies that illustrate the potential of 3D across disciplines.

About the Speaker:

Sara Gonzalez is a science librarian at the University of Florida where she is the physical sciences and mathematics liaison and coordinates UF Libraries’ 3D Service and the MADE@UF software and virtual reality development lab.  She holds a Ph.D. in Geophysics from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an M.L.I.S. from Florida State University.  Her current research interests include emerging technologies in libraries, modeling and visualization of data, and scientific literacy instruction. Dr. Gonzalez recently co-authored 3D Printing: A Practical Guide for Librarians (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016).

About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:

The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Other upcoming webinars in the series include:

  • Date pending for: Caribbean Memory

Recordings of all webinars will be available in dLOC soon after the webinar.

Please join us for next stage conversations from the webinars, to take place at ACURIL’s 2017 annual conference, focusing on Interdisciplinary Research in the Caribbean: http://acuril2017puertorico.com/

Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship

Twitter: @dlocaribbean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, Webinar 3, Colony in Crisis

carribean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event featuring innovative digital work with Colony in Crisis, April 11, 2017, at 11am (Miami Time).

Presenter: Nathan Dize and Abby Broughton (Vanderbilt University)

Click here to participate in the online event: http://ufsmathers.adobeconnect.com/Caribbean

About the Presentation:

A digital project created in 2014 through the collaboration of two graduate students and a librarian, A Colony in Crisis (CiC, https://colonyincrisis.lib.umd.edu/) exemplifies interdisciplinary and interdepartmental research in the contemporary, media-enhanced age of humanities scholarship. Working through the framework of the grain crisis of 1789 in colonial Saint-Domingue, CiC provides English translations and introductions of original French pamphlets in hopes of promoting a glimpse into one of the many alternative histories of the Atlantic World in the years preceding the Haitian Revolution. With the goal of curating archival documents in order to offer students and scholars alike the possibility of working with archival texts across language barriers, the team partners with instructors to implement the project in the undergraduate classroom. Fall 2015 saw the implementation of CiC in an upper-level French literature course. One year later, the team reflects on their first foray into the classroom and where to steer the project over the years to come.

About the Speakers:

Abby R. Broughton is a PhD student in the Department of French and Italian at Vanderbilt University, where she specializes in 20th century queer literature, body and identity politics, and the intersection of illustration and text. Abby is a co-author, translator, and editor of A Colony in Crisis: The Saint-Domingue Grain Shortage of 1789.

Nathan H. Dize is a PhD student in the Department of French and Italian at Vanderbilt University where he specializes in Haitian theater, poetry, and revolutionary poetics during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Nathan is the content curator, translator, and editor of A Colony in Crisis: The Saint-Domingue Grain Shortage of 1789.

About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:

The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Other upcoming webinars in the series include:

  • May 10, 11am Miami time, Dr. Sara Gonzalez on 3D printing services

Recordings of all webinars will be available in dLOC soon after the webinar.

Please join us for next stage conversations from the webinars, to take place at ACURIL’s 2017 annual conference, focusing on Interdisciplinary Research in the Caribbean: http://acuril2017puertorico.com/

 

Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship

Twitter: @dlocaribbean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age: 2nd Webinar

carribean
Please join us for an upcoming event featuring innovative digital work with a small axe platform for digital practice: sx archipelagos, February 28, 2017, at 11am (Miami Time).
Presenter: Dr. Alex Gil, Columbia University and sx: archipelagos
Click here to participate in the online event.
About the Presentation:
a small axe platform for digital practice: sx archipelagos (http://smallaxe.net/sxarchipelagos/) is the latest born-digital articulation of the Small Axe Project. It is a peer-reviewed publication platform devoted to creative exploration, debate, and critical thinking about and through digital practices in contemporary scholarly and artistic work in and on the Caribbean. Given the wide implications of the “digital turn” for our very conceptions of knowledge, our mission is to discern the ways in which the digital may enhance and transform our comprehension of the regional and diasporic Caribbean. sx archipelagos responds to this challenge with three distinct dimensions of critical production: scholarly essays; digital scholarship projects; and digital project reviews.
About the Speaker:
Alex Gil is Digital Scholarship Coordinator for the Humanities and History at Columbia University and affiliate Faculty of the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He serves as a collaborator with faculty, students and the library leveraging non-trivial technologies in humanities research, pedagogy and scholarly communications. Current projects include Ed, a digital platform for minimal editions of literary texts; the Translation Toolkit; and, In The Same Boats, a visualization of trans-Atlantic intersections of black intellectuals in the 20th century. He is founder and former chair of the Global Outlook::Digital Humanities initiative, co-founder and co-director of the Group for Experimental Methods in the Humanities and the Studio@Butler at Columbia University, and founder and co-editor of SX Archipelagos.
About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital AgeWebinar Series:
The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on
projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.
Other upcoming webinars in the series include:
• Apr. 11, 11am Miami time: Nathan Dize and Abby Broughton on Colony in Crisis
• May 10, 11am Miami time, Dr. Sara Gonzalez on 3D printing services
• Date pending for: Caribbean Memory
Recordings of all webinars will be available in dLOC soon after the webinar.
Twitter: #digcaribbeanscholarship

Webinar Series: Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age

carribean

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event featuring innovative digital work in Dominica on January 18, 2017, at 11am (Miami Time).

Presenter: Dr. Schuyler Esprit, Dominica State College, Create Caribbean Inc.

Click here to participate in the online event: http://ufsmathers.adobeconnect.com/Caribbean

About the Presentation:

In the small island developing state of the Commonwealth of Dominica, the push towards Information and Communications Technology (ICT) development has risen rapidly on the national agenda. This is true for several sectors, including entrepreneurship and education. However, national efforts to understand the impact of expanding technologies, particularly through the use of digital humanities or humanities computing, has been much slower despite collective enthusiasm among library and museum experts, academics and other intellectuals workers about developing the technological scope and reach of their work. For the most part, efforts and resources to encourage ICT use have minimized these very knowledge and culture nerve centers that inform the content of entrepreneurship through technology. Create Caribbean Inc. is a research institute located in Dominica, designed on the principles and values of digital scholarship and practicing digital humanities methodologies, and is one of the first of its kind in the English-speaking Caribbean to formalize the confluence of archival studies, heritage preservation, academic research, higher education curriculum development and the wave of technological advancement. Founded in 2014, the Institute has entered into a partnership with the Dominica State College to institutionalize and create national conversation and impact on innovative knowledge acquisition and sharing amidst economic and geographic constraints that create large social gaps in access to libraries, research, cultural activities and technological experimentation. This presentation will explore the best practices of Create Caribbean Inc., the Research Institute at Dominica State College to consider its goals and objectives, growth process, challenges and plans for enhancement and expansion beyond Dominica and into the wider Caribbean. The presentation will outline the role of each of the institute’s core areas – heritage preservation, academic research, higher education curriculum development, college teaching and community outreach – through the lens of the digital humanities and its impact on the Caribbean space. I will also include a discussion of the benefits of adopting digital humanities vocabulary, theory and praxis within the region, adapting those elements to considerations of economic, social and political peculiarities of the Caribbean.

About the Speaker: Dr. Schuyler Esprit is a scholar of Caribbean literature and cultural studies, and postcolonial theory.  Dr. Esprit holds a PhD in English literature from University of Maryland – College Park. She is the Founding Director of Create Caribbean Inc. (http://createcaribbean.org/create/), Research Institute at Dominica State College. The Research Institute supports students and scholars to use digital technologies for research, teaching and learning in areas of Caribbean development, especially its culture, history and heritage. She currently works as Dean of Academic Affairs at Dominica State College. Dr. Esprit has also taught and held professional positions at a number of universities in the United States. She is now completing her book entitled West Indian Readers: A Social History and its digital companion, both of which are historical explorations of reading culture in the Caribbean. She has also written the introduction to the 2016 Papillote Press edition of The Orchid House, the 1953 novel by Dominican writer Phyllis Shand Allfrey.

About the Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Webinar Series:

The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), in partnership with the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL), the Graduate School of Information Sciences and Technologies of the University of Puerto Rico, and the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives roundtable (LACCHA) of the Society of American Archivists (SAA), has organized a series of online events, Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age, a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Other upcoming webinars in the series include:

  • Feb. 28, 11am Miami time: Dr. Alex Gil on small axe: archipelagos
  • 11, 11am Miami time: Nathan Dize and Abby Broughton on Colony in Crisis
  • May 10, 11am Miami time, Dr. Sara Gonzalez on 3D printing services
  • Date pending for: Caribbean Memory

Recordings of all webinars will be available in dLOC soon after the webinar.

Please join us for next stage conversations from the webinars, to take place at ACURIL’s 2017 annual conference, focusing on Interdisciplinary Research in the Caribbean: http://acuril2017puertorico.com/

Twitter: @dlocaribbean